Due Friday, 12/14/12 at 8PM

Do as a comment to this post!  Copy and paste your Word document outline!

How to do your outline:

- Make sure each slide has a title according to my comment on the previous post

-Make sure each slide has “Information” which is COPY AND PASTED FROM A SOURCE

-Make sure each slide has at least ONE SOURCE

-Make sure each slide has “Text” which is the same as the information, but in YOUR OWN WORDS – This is what will go on your PowerPoint slides!!

JUST AS A REFERENCE POINT, your PowerPoints will be due Thursday, 12/20/12 by 8PM and presentations will begin on FRIDAY 12/21/12.

Also, MAKE SURE YOU HAVE STARTED TESTING YOUR SCIENCE FAIR PROJECT – Your data is due in the MIDDLE OF JANUARY – which means you only have ONE MONTH left!!

50 Comments »

  1. ryanprashad2012 Said,

    December 11, 2012@ 3:38 PM      Reply

    sorry it made me delete the http:// part

    Name: Ryan Prashad
    Topic: Forms of Energy
    Type of Science: Chemistry
    Performance Indicator: 4.1
    Slide 1 Topic: Endothermic
    • Information: Endothermic refers to a reaction that that absorbs heat from the environment. The term is often used in physiology.
    • Text: The word endothermic refers to a reaction where heat is absorbed. This term is used very often in the science of physiology

    Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030814

    Slide 2 Topic: Exothermic
    • Information: An exothermic reaction is a chemical reaction which produces heat. Methane reacting with oxygen is an example of an exothermic reaction.
    • Text: the opposite of an exothermic reaction is an exothermic reaction. A simple exothermic reaction is methane combusting with oxygen.
    Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2432500281

    Slide 3 Topic: Reactants
    • Information: A chemical reaction goes through three stages, the initial stage consisting of the reactants, followed by the transition stage of the activated complex, and the final stage, in which the products are formed.
    • Text: reactants are the substances at the beginning of a chemical reaction
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030022
    • Slide 4 Topic: PE Diagrams
    • Information: Matter may store energy even when at rest. This energy, stored and held for future use, is referred to as potential energy
    • Text: a potential energy diagram (PE diagram) is a diagram of the potential energy a specific amount of matter holds.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/topic/actionWin?query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&display-query=&mode=view&limiter=AC+y&showDisambiguation=&displayGroups=&userGroupName=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MVKQ&scanId

    Slide 6 Topic: Products
    • Information: The products are the substances that are formed during the chemical change
    • Text: after the chemical reaction is finished, the products are the substances formed at the end of the chemical reaction
    Source: http://www.chemprofessor.com/outline7b.htm

    Slide 7 Topic: Activation Energy
    • Information: The term activation energy refers to the minimum amount of energy required for a chemical reaction to occur.
    • Text: activation energy is the minimum amount of energy in order for a chemical reaction to occur.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2432500011
    Slide 8 Topic: Catalyst
    • Information: Catalysts are elements or compounds that increase the speed of a chemical reaction without being consumed in the reaction.
    • Text: these are substances that speed up the rate of a chemical reaction
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/topic/actionWin?query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&display-query=&mode=view&limiter=AC+y&showDisambiguation=&displayGroups=&userGroupName=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MVUG&scanId

    Slide 9 Topic: Heat of Reaction
    • Information: The heat of reaction is the heat that is absorbed when a substance is formed from its elements.
    • Text: this is the amount of heat that is absorbed in a chemical reaction to form the products
    Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2432500350

    Conclusion slide: In conclusion, these are all terms involved when studying chemistry and when watching a chemical reaction happen. This can also help society learn about different types of chemical reactions and why those chemical reactions happen.
    Bibliography Slide:
    “Endothermic.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030814&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=a714cdfaa33c406ec33bc859f274c428

    “Exothermic Reactions.” World of Chemistry. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2432500281&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=cd620770e2906aaffa025f1e489a2b7e

    “Activated complex.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030022&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=77ceb224a861f5ec4a17f3d99e773dcb
    “Potential Energy.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=true&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=GALE%7C00000000MVKQ&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500395&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=692fda9b9e390d61fe5f816c3dfda1ce

    “Reactants and Products.” Reactants and Products. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.

    “Activation energy.” World of Chemistry. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2432500011&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=2b3523e743ecee1388eed7f4c5c4855d

    “Catalyst.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=true&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=GALE%7C00000000MVUG&documentId=GALE%7CCV1648500123&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=da6f22cd538f27c1811ad03341320ef3
    “Heat of Reaction.” World of Chemistry. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2432500350&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=0685377c1cb7c40b48f17b89e558f275

  2. saudmillwala Said,

    December 13, 2012@ 1:43 PM      Reply

    Ms. silverstien i am not in school today because i hurt my knee badly. And my question to you was what do we put for the conclusion paragraph? please right back thank you

  3. saudmillwala Said,

    December 13, 2012@ 1:56 PM      Reply

    It made me delete the httpl:// part
    Name: Saud Millwala
    Name: saud
    Topic: Electromagnetism
    Type of Science: Physics
    Performance Indicator: (# & text):5.1o Kinetic friction* is a force that opposes motion.

    Slide 1 Topic: Title Page kinetic friction
    • Information : When two surfaces are moving with respect to one another.
    • Text: Kinetic friction is when two surfaces of two objects are sliding against each other for example when you rub your hands together the heat you feel is because of kinetic friction. Another example is when the skin is holding a pencil while it sits in your palm.
    • Source:
    hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/frict2.html

    Slide 2 Topic: Kinetic
    • Information: caused by motion. F=ma.
    • Text: Kinetic comes from kinematic which is referred to Newton’s first law of F=ma which is Force equals mass times acceleration.
    • Source: dictionary.reference.com/browse/Kinetic?s=t

    Slide 3 Topic: Friction
    • Information: the force that resists motion when the surface of one object slides over the surface of another
    • Text: friction is when one object rubs with another object and creates heat. Without friction you cannot do many simple tasks like pick up a glass of water or even walk.
    • Source:
    “Friction.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MX36&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500191&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=d8a7ea4cc73e45d91efdb8a072532936

    Slide 4 Topic: Elasticity
    • Information: with sufficient force, the substance should change its size, shape, or volume. If, when the force is removed, the sample returns to its original state, then it is elastic.
    • Text: Elasticity is something that can change its physical form with enough force and then can be changed back to its original form when the force is removed like a rubber band. A rubber band stretches and becomes longer or wider when force is applied and when the force is removed it go back to its original small shape.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV1648500203&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=ce741c3208a2dc10fb40ada98e5d76b8

    Slide 5 Topic: Mass
    • Information: the quantity of matter an object possesses. Mass gets confused with weight.
    • Text: Mass is the amount of matter an object possesses. Mass can get confused with weight because the weight can change on an object like a rock because the weight on the earth would be different from the moon. Weight has to do with the amount of gravitational pull because on the moon the rock would weigh less than it would on earth and the mass has to do with the quantity of matter and that doesn’t change.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644300626&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=6fd685688efd6e050efd0f2a97c346fc

    Slide 6 Topic: heat
    • Information: Heat causes an object to be warm and flows from warm objects to cold ones
    • Text: Heat is warm and flows to cold objects to make it warm.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500224&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=012fb715f18d0490d3f6656552b881a2

    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion:
    • In conclusion these are most of the terms that go with kinetic friction and what it really is and how this is used in everyday lives.

    Bibliography Slide:
    “Science news.” Science World 22 Oct. 2007: TE4+. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/MagazinesDetailsPage/MagazinesDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Magazines&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CA169824709&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=699a94631f588f094867615fa5e905b9
    “Mass.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644300626&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=6fd685688efd6e050efd0f2a97c346fc
    “Heat.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500224&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=012fb715f18d0490d3f6656552b881a2
    “Elasticity.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV1648500203&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=ce741c3208a2dc10fb40ada98e5d76b8

    dictionary.reference.com/browse/Kinetic?s=t

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/frict2.html

  4. LiamTormey2012 Said,

    December 13, 2012@ 3:24 PM      Reply

    Name: Liam Tormey
    Topic: Asteroids, Comets, Meteors
    Type of Science: Earth Science
    Performance Indicator: 1.2d Asteroids, comets, and meteors are components of our solar system.

    Slide 1 Topic: Small Solar System Bodies (SSSB’s)
    Information: The first objects that qualify as small bodies are asteroids discovered in the early nineteenth century
    Text: Asteroids are the first ever small body found in the universe

    Slide 2 Topic: Ceres
    Information: Giuseppe Piazzi discovered the first asteroid, Ceres, on New Year’s Day, 1801, then lost when it traveled behind the Sun.
    Text: First asteroid; Giuseppe Piazzi New Years 1801

    Slide 3 Topic: Omens
    importance to them as divine omens, keeping careful records of their sightings.
    Text: Stars; Ancient Observers

    Slide 4 Topic: How are Comets Formed?
    Information: The particles started orbiting in unison, but after about 20 years their trajectories started to diverge significantly.
    Text: Break off: 20 years

    Slide 5 Topic: Meteor Showers
    Information: A meteor shower is usually, but not always, named after the constellation in which the radiant falls on the night of the shower maximum
    Text: Perseid best known

    Slide 6 Topic: What is the speed of Meteors?
    Information: Meteors follow different orbits and collide with Earth at different angles
    Text: Angles; Orbits

    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion: In conclusion there are some terms that involve Asteroids, Comets, and Meteors
    Bibliography Slide

    • LiamTormey2012 Said,

      December 13, 2012@ 5:25 PM      Reply

      Hey, Ms. Silverstein I erased all the links so ave to post it again

    • LiamTormey2012 Said,

      December 13, 2012@ 5:27 PM      Reply

      Name: Liam Tormey
      Topic: Asteroids, Comets, Meteors
      Type of Science: Earth Science
      Performance Indicator: 1.2d Asteroids, comets, and meteors are components of our solar system.

      Slide 1 Topic: Small Solar System Bodies (SSSB’s)
      Information: The first objects that qualify as small bodies are asteroids discovered in the early nineteenth century
      Text: Asteroids are the first ever small body found in the universe
      Source: “Small Bodies.” Space Sciences. Ed. Pat Dasch. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.

      Slide 2 Topic: Ceres
      Information: Giuseppe Piazzi discovered the first asteroid, Ceres, on New Year’s Day, 1801, then lost when it traveled behind the Sun.
      Text: First asteroid; Giuseppe Piazzi New Years 1801
      Source: “Heavenly Rocks: Asteroids Discovered and Meteorites Explained.” Science and Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol. 5. Detroit: Gale, 2001. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.

      Slide 3 Topic: Omens
      importance to them as divine omens, keeping careful records of their sightings.
      Text: Stars; Ancient Observers
      Source: “Nova and supernova.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.

      Slide 4 Topic: How are Comets Formed?
      Information: The particles started orbiting in unison, but after about 20 years their trajectories started to diverge significantly.
      Text: Break off: 20 years
      Source: “Two Solar System puzzles solved.” Journal of College Science Teaching 42.1 (2012): 13. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.

      Slide 5 Topic: Meteor Showers
      Information: A meteor shower is usually, but not always, named after the constellation in which the radiant falls on the night of the shower maximum
      Text: Perseid best known
      Source: “Meteoroids and meteorites.” World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.

      Slide 6 Topic: What is the speed of Meteors?
      Information: Meteors follow different orbits and collide with Earth at different angles
      Text: Angles; Orbits
      Source: “Ask Astro.” Astronomy June 2007: 64. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.

      Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion: In conclusion there are some terms that involve Asteroids, Comets, and Meteors
      Bibliography Slide

  5. ibrahimsupersaiyan4 Said,

    December 13, 2012@ 3:30 PM      Reply

    Slide 1 Topic: introduction Charles Darwin’s theory
    Charles darwin didn’t create the theory. He was studying not do spieces evolve but how the evolve
    Source ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 2 Topics: Evolution of humans
    Humans originated from ape like creatures 7000000 years ago.The modern study of human evolution is called paleanthropology this helps us answer certain questions

    Source ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 3 Topics: Non biological evolution
    It happens with non bioligical things
    Source ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 4 Topics: Evidence for evolution
    The strongest form of evedence for evolution is observations of living animals
    Source ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 5 Topics: Paleontology
    Fossils are the remains of organisms that used to live
    Source ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 6 Topics: Biogeography
    Allopatry and sympatry are terms used to describe the comparative distributions of populations and species
    Source ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 7 Topics: Morphology
    Some scientists think that the whale is a morphed or evolved form of artiodactyls or hippos

    Source ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 8 Topics: Genetics
    Natural radiation exposure changes DNA molecules that is a change of genetics

    Source ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 9 Topics: Developmental biology
    Species are developed in their embryo
    Source ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 10: Conclusion and bibliography
    Harrison, Alexis. “The Relevance of Evolution to Contemporary Society.” ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCX1919700008. Alexis Harrison, 13 Dec. 2012. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.

  6. christianedwards2012 Said,

    December 13, 2012@ 5:30 PM      Reply

    Save on your computer and flash drive in a Word file called “LastnamePIPOutline2012″
    Directions: Your outline is a basic list of what you will include on your slides. Each slide should have its own number. If you are using a source on your slide, the source should be included on your outline. It is suggested that your first slides contain interesting facts about your topic, and your second slide(s) contain vocabulary words. After those, you may get into brief details about your topic to teach the class your performance indicator.
    Name: Christian Edwards
    Topic: Atoms
    Type of Science: Chemistry
    Performance Indicator: 3.1 Explain the properties of materials in terms of the arrangement and properties of the atoms that compose them.
    Slide 1 Topic: Title Page
    • Information:
    • Text: Atoms By Christian Edwards
    • Source:
    Slide 2 Topic: Atoms
    Information: Atoms are the smallest particles of matter that have distinct physical and chemical properties. The different types of atoms are called elements; each element is denoted by an atomic weight and an atomic symbol. There are about a hundred stable elements, and out of these all the substances in the universe are built. Since the modern atomic theory was first proposed in the early nineteenth century, scientists have also discovered a large number of subatomic particles.

    • Text: Atoms are small parts of elements, but have distinct and chemical properties. Different atoms are called elements.

    Source: “Atoms.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030207&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=c9fab7343ba00c0337473415ed148c7c

    Slide 3 Topic: Hydrogen Atoms
    Information: Hydrogen (H) is the most abundant element in the universe. Nearly nine out of every 10 atoms in the universe are hydrogen atoms. Hydrogen is also common on Earth. It is the third most abundant element after oxygen and silicon. About 15 percent of all the atoms found on Earth are hydrogen atoms.

    • Text: Hydrogen (H) is an abundant element. It’s actually the most. Actually, 9 out of 10 atoms are Hydrogen.
    Source: “Hydrogen.” Chemical Elements. David E. Newton. Ed. Kathleen J. Edgar. 2nd ed. Detroit: UXL, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2640200039&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=d9e67605156152ae3f79b8ce1c9014ab

    Slide 4 Topic: Helium
    Information: Helium (He) is a noble gas element denoted by the atomic symbol He. It has an atomic number of 2, and the average atomic weight of its isotopes is 4.0026. It is a colorless, odorless gas. In many respects, helium is one of the most unusual elements known to science. Helium is far more abundant throughout the rest of the universe than it is here on Earth. In fact, helium was first found to exist on the Sun and was named using the Greek word for sun, Helios. In 1868, French astronomer Pierre Janssen (1824-1907) went to India to study a total solar eclipse. Although lame from a childhood accident, Janssen traveled the world in pursuit of such astronomical events. During the eclipse, he analyzed the wavelengths of light displayed in the Sun’s spectrum and found a yellow spectral line that he did not recognize. Janssen realized it might indicate the existence of a new element.

    • Text: Helium (He) is a noble gas that has an atomic number of 2. It’s a colorless and odorless element.
    Source: “Helium.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV1648500291&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=5146bde6944c8b100bc09ec3bf93a6a6

    Slide 5 Topic: Atomic Bombs
    Information: The invention of the atomic bomb was historically inevitable. The scientific knowledge necessary for construction of such a bomb was being discovered just as World War II was beginning. The enormous new source of energy offered by nuclear fission) was bound, eventually, to be applied in the construction of a bomb. The scientific discovery that made the bomb possible occurred in 1934. Enrico Fermi (1901-1954), an Italian physicist, was trying to produce element number 93 by bombarding element 92, uranium, with neutrons. Fermi thought he had been successful, but his results were not clear-cut. Other scientists attempted to repeat his work. In 1938, Otto Hahn (1879-1968) and Fritz Strassman showed that the products of Fermi’s reaction were nuclei from the middle of the periodic table.

    • Text: The Atomic Bomb was at its first stages in the beginning of WWII and made its debute to the world in August of 1945 and to today be the only time a bomb that large is used in combat. This is created by a nuclear fusion.
    Source: “Atomic bomb.” World of Invention. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV1647500058&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=2761c283653e49717406eadb836509c8

    Slide 6 Topic: Carbon
    Information: Carbon (C) is an extraordinary element. It occurs in more compounds than any other element in the periodic table. The periodic table is a chart that shows how chemical elements are related to each other. More than 10 million compounds of carbon are known. No other element, except for hydrogen, occurs in even a fraction of that number of compounds. As an element, carbon occurs in a striking variety of forms. Coal, soot, and diamonds are all nearly pure forms of carbon. Carbon also occurs in a form known as fullerenes or buckyballs. Buckyball carbon holds the promise for opening a whole new field of chemistry.

    • Text: Carbon is an element that occurs in more compounds than any other element in the periodic table.
    Source: “Carbon.” Chemical Elements. David E. Newton. Ed. Kathleen J. Edgar. 2nd ed. Detroit: UXL, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2640200017&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=1a52c81d6307437de2ec6ef77d6884b3

    Slide 7 Topic: Oxygen
    Information: Oxygen is the simplest group VIA element and is, under normal atmospheric conditions, usually found as a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas. Oxygen has an atomic number of 8 and an atomic mass of 16.0. The liquid and solid forms, which are strongly paramagnetic, are a pale blue color. Oxygen has a boiling point of -297°F (-182.8°C) and a melting point of -368.7°F (-222.6°C).Oxygen is the third most abundant element found in the sun, after hydrogen and helium, and plays an important role in the carbon-nitrogen cycle. Oxygen composes 21% of Earth’s atmosphere by volume and is vital to the existence of carbon-based life forms.

    • Text: Oxygen (O) is an element under an atmospheric condition. It has no color or smell to it.
    Source: “Oxygen.” World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2641950335&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=dde1e0f144683f56f1f8a425877b8c82

    Slide 8 Topic: Nitrogen
    Information: Nitrogen–the fifth most abundant element in the universe–is the first element in Group 15 of the periodic table. The elements that make up this group are sometimes known as the nitrogen family, after nitrogen itself. Nitrogen has an atomic number of 7, an atomic mass of 14.0067, and a chemical symbol of N.Nitrogen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas with a density of 7.2286 x 10-4 ounces per cubic inch (1.2506 x 10-3 grams per cubic centimeter), slightly less than that of air. Nitrogen has a boiling point of about -320.42°F (-195.79°C) and a freezing point of around -346.02°F (-210.01°C). When it freezes, nitrogen becomes a white solid that looks somewhat like snow. Nitrogen is slightly soluble in water, to the extent of about two liters of nitrogen to 100 liters of water.

    • Text: Nitrogen (N) has no smell, color or taste. If you freeze it, nitrogen eventually turns white.
    Source: “Nitrogen.” World of Chemistry. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7CAAA000017199&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2432500494&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=c8ad58ca38ec45c0f9c866eaf0567885

    Slide 9 Topic: Closing
    Information: Atoms are the elementary building blocks of material substances. Although the term atom, derived from the Greek word atomos, meaning “indivisible,” would seem inappropriate for an entity that–as science has established–is divisible, the word atom still makes sense in certain contexts. Atoms can still be regarded as indivisible in the sense that once split; the atom loses its identity. For example, an atom of gold is the building block of gold. If we split a gold atom, there is no more gold. As Carl H. Snyder has written, an atom is “the smallest particle of an element that we can identify as that element.”

    • Text: Atoms are used for building blocks. Atom comes from the Greek word for “atomos” which means invisible.
    Source: “Atoms and Atomic Theory.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500019&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=35ab789082b6fc7d622cb9438c8a6f09

    Slide 10 Topic: Bibliography
    • Information:
    • Text: Sources
    • Source:

  7. Christopher Possidel Said,

    December 13, 2012@ 5:49 PM      Reply

    Name: Christopher Possidel
    Topic: Gene Mutation
    Type of Science: Living Environment
    Performance Indicator: 2.1a Genes are inherited, but their expression can be modified by interactions with the
    environment.
    Slide 1 Topic: What Is Mutation?
    • Information: A mutation is any change in the genetic structure of a living cell. When that cell divides, the mutation is transmitted to new cells that are formed, and in the case of an organism, may result in offspring that look or behave differently than its parents. Mutations occur at the cellular level.
    • Text: Mutation changes a living organism at the molecular level. When a living cell becomes divided, that is when a mutation forms because it is changing the offspring.
    • Source: “Mutation.” UXL Complete Life Science Resource. Ed. Julie Carnagie and Leonard C. Bruno. Detroit: UXL, 2009. Gale Science in Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 2 Topic: The Role of Genes in Heredity
    • Information: Cells carry the code for inherited characteristics in threadlike structures called chromosomes. Which in turn, carry genes that consist of a substance called deoxyribonucleic acid, this is DNA. The coded information contained in the DNA determines the characteristics of living things.
    • Text: eye color, height, and genetic diseases (diabetes) are brought through chromosomes.DNA, determines what you look like.
    • Source: “Mutation.” UXL Complete Life Science Resource. Ed. Julie Carnagie and Leonard C. Bruno. Detroit: UXL, 2009. Gale Science in Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 3: Genetics in the Evolutionary Process
    • Information: Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection–which is highly important to understanding the life sciences –states that individual organisms possessing certain traits or characteristics that are most suited to a particular environment have a better chance of surviving and therefore of passing these traits on to their offspring. In other words, organisms in possession of favorable traits allow these traits to be “selected” by nature (natural selection) so that these organisms survive and produce young that have the same favorable traits.
    • Text: Genes play a crucial role in adaptation; How traits are passed down
    Source: “Adaptation.” UXL Complete Life Science Resource. Ed. Julie Carnagie and Leonard C. Bruno. Detroit: UXL, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 4 Topic: Genetic Mutation
    • Information: Carcinogens cause cancer by producing changes (or mutations) in the genetic material, or DNA, of a cell. Genetic disorders are generally one of two types: those that are inherited (and are governed by the same rules that determine all our traits), and those that are the result of some type of mutation or change that took place while the embryo was developing. Sometimes this mutation is caused by environmental factors.
    • Text: Carcinogens cause user by producing mutations in DNA.
    • Source: “Carcinogen.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2008. Gale Science in Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    • “Genetic Disorders.” UXL Complete Life Science Resource. Ed. Julie Carnagie and Leonard C. Bruno. Detroit: UXL, 2010. Gale Science in Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 5 Topic: Genetic Mutation and DNA Structure
    Information: Under most circumstances, DNA molecules are very stable. Anything that can bring about a mutation in DNA is called a mutagen. Small amounts of one mutagen may have no harm at all on an organism’s DNA, while larger amounts of the same mutagen may cause mutations. Most mutagens fall into one of two categories. They are either a form of energy or a chemical. In addition to x rays, other forms of radiation that can cause mutagens include ultraviolet radiation, gamma rays, and ionizing radiation.
    • Text: Mutations occur because of alterations to DNA.
    • Radiation, ultraviolet radiation can be used to mutate
    • Source: “Mutation.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science in Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 8 Topic: How Aging Is Related to Genetics
    • Information: Genetics (inherited physical characteristics) also appears to play a role in the process of aging and death. People whose parents or grandparents live to old age seem to have a better chance of living long lives themselves. Aging is a series of biological changes that follow a natural progression from birth through maturity to old age and death. For most people, advancing age is characterized by graying or thinning hair, loss of height, wrinkling of the skin, and decreased muscular strength. Every species has a different normal life span.
    • Text: genetics have a role in aging Seen through wrinkles, graying hair
    Source: “Aging and death.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.

    Bibliography Slide:
    ” UXL Complete Life Science Resource. Ed. Julie Carnagie and Leonard C. Bruno. Detroit: UXL, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    “Aging and death.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    “Carcinogen.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2008. Gale Science in Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    “Mutation.” UXL Complete Life Science Resource. Ed. Julie Carnagie and Leonard C. Bruno. Detroit: UXL, 2009. Gale Science in Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    “Mutation.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science in Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.

  8. brookassefa2012 Said,

    December 13, 2012@ 11:09 PM      Reply

    Name: Brook Assefa
    Topic: Observation of Sun and Stars
    Type of Science: Earth Science
    Performance Indicator: 1.1c Earth’s coordinate system of latitude and longitude, with the equator and prime meridian as reference lines, is based upon Earth’s rotation and our observation of the Sun and stars.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction, Stars
    • Information: A star is a body of hot gas and dust that shines by its own light produced by nuclear fusion reactions. The nearest star to Earth is the Sun.
    • Text: Star is a circular object full of hot gases and light.
    Stars in night sky are in groups called galaxies.
    Galaxy is a group of stars, and clouds of gas and dust.
    More than millions of stars in the sky.
    • Source:

    Slide 2 Topic: Twinkling
    • Information: Stars are located at a quite a distance from earth. When we view them from earth, we are actually observing the different layers of the stars along with swirling air and changing temperatures. When the light from the star travels a large distance through different atmosphere conditions, the rays get bent. Every layer of earth has air moving in different directions and with different intensities. The light travelling through these random distractions distorts the image of the star and it appears to twinkle.
    • Text: The earth and stars have a big gap between them.

    Stars have different layers.

    Its light travels a long time through atmospheric conditions and the rays are crooked.

    The light traveling through misshapes the figure and starts to twinkle.

    • Source:

    Slide 3 Topic: Temperature
    • Information: Oftentimes you may associate blue with freezing, or red with hot, but with stars it’s exactly the opposite. Blue stars are the hottest, with their surfaces sometimes exceeding 50,000° Fahrenheit. Yellow stars, like the Sun, are cooler, but still very hot. Their surfaces reach about 9,932° Fahrenheit. Red stars are the coolest, with their surfaces sometimes less than 5,000° Fahrenheit. The biggest and brightest stars are the hottest. Some of the big ones can grow to be over 100 times the size of our Sun. Their surface temperature can exceed 90,000° Fahrenheit. This heat makes them blue in color, or sometimes even white.
    • Text: Stars that are blue are the hottest with temperature going up to 50,000° Fahrenheit.

    The yellow stars are cool but are still hot.

    Red stars are the coolest stars reaching less than 5,000° Fahrenheit.

    The bigger the star the brighter the light.

    Some stars can even turn white with all the heat.

    • Source:

    Slide 4 Topic: Evolution of stars
    • Information: There are many different types of stars, from the tiny brown dwarfs to the red and blue supergiants. A protostar is what you have before a star forms. A protostar is a collection of gas that has collapsed down from a giant molecular cloud. The protostar phase of stellar evolution lasts about 100,000 years. A T Tauri star is stage in a star’s formation and evolution right before it becomes a main sequence star. This phase occurs at the end of the protostar phase, when the gravitational pressure holding the star together is the source of all its energy. T Tauri stars don’t have enough pressure and temperature at their cores to generate nuclear fusion, but they do resemble main sequence stars; they’re about the same temperature but brighter because they’re a larger. The majority of all stars in our galaxy, and even the Universe, are main sequence stars. Our Sun is a main sequence star, and so are our nearest neighbors, Sirius and Alpha Centauri A. Main sequence stars can vary in size, mass and brightness, but they’re all doing the same thing: converting hydrogen into helium in their cores, releasing a tremendous amount of energy. When a star has consumed its stock of hydrogen in its core, fusion stops and the star no longer generates an outward pressure to counteract the inward pressure pulling it together. When a star has completely run out of hydrogen fuel in its core and it lacks the mass to force higher elements into fusion reaction, it becomes a white dwarf star. Red dwarf stars are the most common kind of stars in the Universe. If a star has between 1.35 and 2.1 times the mass of the Sun, it doesn’t form a white dwarf when it dies.

    • Text: There are different types of stars.

    There is a protostar, t tauri, main sequence, red giant, white dwarf, red dwarf star, neutron star, or supergiant star.

    Protostar is a star before it starts. T tauri star is a star between the main sequence and protostar. Main sequence stars are the majority of the stars in the galaxy like the sun. Red giant stars are stars 100 times larger than main sequence stars. White dwarfs are stars when hydrogen fuel is ran out. Red dwarf stars are stars that conserve their hydrogen fuel the most. Neutron stars are stars that are about 2 times the size of the Sun. Supergiant stars are stars and probably won’t see one.
    • Source:

    Slide 5 Topic: Supernova
    • Information: Supernovas are exploding stars. Red giant stars explode when they have used up their hydrogen and helium fuel, and converted most of their atoms to iron atoms.
    • Text: For Red Giant stars to explode, they must use up their hydrogen and helium fuel.
    Red giant stars convert most of their atoms to iron atoms.
    Supernovas are exploding stars.

    • Source:

    Slide 6 Topic: Layers of the sun
    • Information: This is the inner most part of the Sun. The core is around 150 times as dense as water and has a blazing temperature of around 15 million degrees Celsius or 28 million degrees Fahrenheit.
    This is the layer of the Sun above the super dense core. This layer is not as dense as the core but it is still so dense that light from the core bounces around taking about 100,000 years to move through the radiative zone.
    This is the layer of the Sun above the radiative zone. : Much like the bubbles in a pot of boiling, the heat from the edge of the radiative zone rises until it cools enough that it sinks back down.
    • Text: The core is the most inner part of the Sun and is about 150 times as dense as water with temperature of around 15 million degree Celsius or 28 million degree Fahrenheit.
    Radiative zone is above the core and has less density. However, it is dense enough that the light from the core bounces around and takes around 100,000 years to move through the radiative zone.
    Convection Zone is the layer above the radiative zone. The heat from the edge of the radiative zone rises up and when it cools, it sinks down.
    • Source:

    Slide 7 Topic: Position of stars seasonally
    • Information: When we look at the night sky we see stars in different locations depending on the time of night. We also see different groups of stars depending on the time of year. The reason we see stars move during the night is because the Earth spins. Because the Earth spins, we see the stars rise and set, just as the Sun and Moon do. In addition to rising and setting, however, the Sun and the Moon have an additional motion across the sky.
    • Text: Depending on the time of the year and also what time of the night it is, we see different stars at different locations.
    The stars change their locations because the earth rotates around the sun.
    Because the earth spins we notice that the rising and setting of the sun and moon.
    • Source:

    Slide 8 Topic: Conclusion
    • Information: Stars are huge balls of glowing gas in the sky. There are over 200 billion, billion stars in the universe.
    • Text: The sun and stars are both very important objects in our solar system. The sun gives us heat and are over 200 billion stars in the universe.As you can see our solar system is amazing.
    • Source:

    Bibliography Slide:
    “Stars.” http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MV8O&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500495. N.p., 14 Sept. 2011. Web.
    “Everyday Chemistry – Why Do Stars Twinkle?” Everyday Chemistry – Why Do Stars Twinkle? N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    “The Temperature of the Stars.” ThinkQuest. Oracle Foundation, 27 Dec. 2011. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    Cain, Fraser. “Types of Stars.” Universe Today RSS. Universe Today, 28 Jan. 2009. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    “Supernovas.” Supernova. Kidipede, 23 Oct. 2012. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    “Layers of the Sun.” The Sun Today. The Sun Today, n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.

    • brookassefa2012 Said,

      December 13, 2012@ 11:10 PM      Reply

      Ms.Silverstein it wouldn’t let me put the sources for the slides so I took them off.

    • natfiore2012 Said,

      December 14, 2012@ 8:32 PM      Reply

      how did you get on the website?

  9. georgejarvis2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 4:03 PM      Reply

    Name: George Jarvis
    Topic: Weather variables
    Type of Science: Earth science
    Performance Indicator: 2.1c Weather patterns become evident when weather variables are observed, measured,
    and recorded. These variables include air temperature, air pressure, moisture (relative
    humidity and dewpoint), precipitation (rain, snow, hail, sleet, etc.), wind speed and
    Slide 1 Topic: Air temperature
    • Information: Air temperature is a measure of how hot or cold the air is. It is the most commonly measured weather parameter. More specifically, temperature describes the kinetic energy, or energy of motion, of the gases that make up air. As gas molecules move more quickly, air temperature increases. Air temperature affects the growth and reproduction of plants and animals, with warmer temperatures promoting biological growth. Air temperature also affects nearly all other weather parameters. For instance, air temperature affects:
    • •the rate of evaporation
    • •relative humidity
    • •wind speed and direction
    • •precipitation patterns and types, such as whether it will rain, snow, or sleet.
    • Text: Air temperature is used to measure to temperature of the air on how hot or cold it is. Temperature is used to describe the motion of gases in the air. If the motion of gas increases then the air temperature increases. Air temperature also effects weather parameters. For example air temperature effects the rate of evaporation, relative humidity, wind speed and direction and precipitation patterns and types, such as whether it will rain, snow, or sleet.
    • Source:
    Slide 2
    Topic: Air pressure
    • Information:

    • As we know, the air in the atmosphere is made up of a number of gases. These gases press down on the Earth’s surface, exerting a force that we call atmospheric pressure or air pressure. Although we are usually unaware of this pressure, it actually presses down very hard – roughly equivalent to the force of an elephant balancing on a desk!
    • Air pressure varies over time and from place to place. If we travel up a mountain or go up in a hot air balloon, for example, the air pressure gets less the higher we go. We can explain this difference by comparing air pressure to a pile of blankets on your bed. Air pressure at sea level is the equivalent of having many n you blankets, which would feel very heavy. If you have only one blanket though, it would feel very light, and this is like the air pressure at the top of a mountain. Each layer of air presses down on the layers below, and so the greatest pressure is at ground level where we have the maximum amount of air above. If we go above the height of mountains and into the stratosphere, the pressure will decrease until it reaches about zero, as here there is hardly any air above it.
    • Text: Air Pressure is gases that press down on the earth’s surface. We can compare air pressure to blankets; if you had a pile of blankets on you then it would feel heavy. That is how the air pressure would feel at sea. If you only had one blanket on you it would feel light, that is how to air pressure is at the top of the mountain.
    • Source:
    Slide 3 Topic: Moisture
    • Information:
    • Along with sunshine, the moisture in the air is what creates all of our weather. These two features work together to form clouds, to make rain and thunderstorms, and to cause winds to blow. Without the sun or moisture, the Earth would have no weather.
    • Even on the sunniest day and over the hottest deserts, the air is full of water. Without realising it, we are surrounded by water all the time. The air acts like a sponge and continually soaks up water. This water is in the form of invisible vapor, and has been evaporated from oceans, lakes and rivers. The actual amount of water vapor in the air (its humidity) depends on how hot and dry the area is.
    • Text: Moisture is what creates are weather. It makes rain, thunderstorms, and causes wind to blow. Moisture is everywhere no matter what kind of climate it is in. For example in a dessert climate moisture is still there surprisingly. The air is full of water, the air is like a sponge that soaks up water non stop.
    • Slide 4 Topic: humidity
    Information: Humidity is a measure of the amount of water vapor in the air. There are different methods for determining humidity, and those methods are reflected in a variety of humidity indexes and readings. The humidity measure used by most meteorologists, which describes the saturation of air with water vapor, is relative humidity.

    • Text: Humidity is the measure of the amount of water vapor in the air. Humidity is mostly measured by meteorologists which describes the saturation of air and water vapor.

    Source: “Weather.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2011. Gale Science In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    • Slide 5 Topic: wind speed
    • Information: Anemometers are devices that measure wind velocity. The type most commonly in use today consists of three or four cups mounted on horizontal arms radiating from the top of a spindle; the cups catch the wind from any direction and spin at a speed proportional to wind speed. The wind speed measurement is either displayed on a dial at the base of the spindle or is recorded at a remote location on a clock-driven drum (anemograph) or digitally.
    • Text: Wind speed is measured by the Anemometers. Anemometers measure wind velocity (speed). The wind speed is either displayed on the dial base of the spindle.
    Source: “Anemometer.” World of Invention. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    • •
    • Slide 6 Topic: cloud cover
    • Information: Weather is the condition of the atmosphere at any given time and place. Weather conditions are determined by six major factors: air temperature, air pressure, humidity of the air, amount and kind of cloud cover, amount and kind of precipitation, and speed and direction of the wind.
    • Text: Weather is based on 6 things. One of those 6 things is cloud cover which is the amount and kind of precipitation , and speed and direction of the wind.
    Source: “Weather.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2011. Gale Science In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.

    • Ms. Silverstein Said,

      December 17, 2012@ 1:50 PM      Reply

      George, you have way too much text on your slides. You should not have sentences.

  10. georgejarvis2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 4:04 PM      Reply

    Ms Silverstein th e website would not let me post the links.

  11. anthonybellomo2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 5:02 PM      Reply

    Name: Anthony Bellomo
    Topic: Big Bang Theory and Evidence
    Type of Science: Earth Science
    Performance Indicator: 1.2a The universe is vast and estimated to be over ten billion years old. The current theory
    is that the universe was created from an explosion called the Big Bang. Evidence for
    this theory includes:
    ¥ cosmic background radiation
    ¥ a red-shift (the Doppler effect) in the light from very distant galaxies.

    Slide 1 Topic: introduction what the big bang means.
    information: Big bang theory describes the origin of the universe and the formation of the forces and matter that are described by the laws of physics and chemistry. The best current evidence dates the big bang and origin of the universe to approximately 13.7 billion years ago.
    Text: 13.7 billion years ago.
    Source: Source Citation
    “Big Bang theory.” World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL .galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2641950059&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=fc9a488741c94b40e013a9f44d326ea2

    Slide 2 Topic: who came up with this theory.
    information: During the 1940s, Ukrainian-born American cosmologist and nuclear physicist George Gamow (1904-1968) developed the modern version of the big bang theory based upon earlier concepts advanced by Russian physicist Alexander (Aleksandr Aleksandrovich) Friedmann (also spelled Fridman; 1888-1925) and Belgian astrophysicist and cosmologist Abbé Georges Lemaître (1894-1966).
    Text: first people found theory (George Gamow , Alexander (Aleksandr Aleksandrovich) Friedmann (also spelled Fridman, Abbé Georges Lemaître )
    Source: Source Citation
    “Big Bang theory.” World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL .galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2641950059&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=fc9a488741c94b40e013a9f44d326ea2

    Slide 3 Topic: when did the big bang happen.
    information: the best current evidence dates the big bang and origin of the universe to approximately 13.7 billion years ago.
    Text: so far we said it happened 13.7 billion years ago.
    Source: Source Citation
    “Big Bang theory.” World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    .galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2641950059&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=fc9a488741c94b40e013a9f44d326ea2

    Slide 4 Topic: what the big bang actually is.
    information: Big bang theory describes the origin of the universe and the formation of the forces and matter that are described by the laws of physics and chemistry. The best current evidence dates the big bang and origin of the universe to approximately 13.7 billion years ago.
    Text: big bang is an explosion it made the universe.
    Source: Big Bang theory.” World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    .galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2641950059&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=fc9a488741c94b40e013a9f44d326ea2

    Slide 5 Topic: how they came up with this theory.
    information: German-American physicist Albert Einstein’s (1879-1955) general theory of relativity, published in 1915, set the stage for the conceptual development of an expanding universe. Einstein had designed his theory to fit a static universe of constant dimensions. In 1919, a Dutch astronomer, Willem de Sitter (1872-1934), showed that Einstein’s theory could also describe an expanding universe. Mathematically, de Sitter’s solution for Einstein’s equation was sound, but observational evidence of expansion was lacking, and Einstein was skeptical.
    Text: albert enstine found it out and willem de sitter
    Source: “Big Bang theory.” World of Earth Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Gale Science In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    .galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2641950059&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=fc9a488741c94b40e013a9f44d326ea2

    Slide 6 Topic: why do people go against this theory.
    information:
    Text: religious beliefs how their religion works
    Source:

    Slide 7 Topic: evidence.
    information: Evidence that the universe may be evolving did not begin to accumulate until the 1920s. Today, the scientific theory that all matter in the universe was created from a gigantic explosion called the “big bang” is widely accepted. It was Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity, published in 1915, which set the stage for the conceptual development of an expanding universe. Einstein had designed his theory to fit a static universe of constant dimensions. In 1919, a Dutch astronomer, Willem de Sitter, showed Einstein’s theory could also describe an expanding universe. Mathematically, de Sitter’s solution for Einstein’s equation was sound; however, observational evidence of expansion was lacking, and Einstein was skeptical.
    Text: albert Einstein helped for this willem de sitter did to
    Source: “Big bang theory.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 1999. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    .galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV1648500081&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=944100607dab2f2c77651aa2347dff8b

    Slide 8 Topic: picture of the big bang explain
    information: Now, a team of physicists says the Big Bang should be modeled as a phase change: the moment when an amorphous, formless universe analogous to liquid water cooled and suddenly crystallized to form four-dimensional space-time, analogous to ice.
    Text: phase change very cold crystallized four dimensions
    global.fncstatic.com/static/managed/img/Scitech/big%20bang%20expan sion%20nasa.jpg

    Slide 9 Topic: conclusion
    information:
    Text:
    Source:

    Bibliography Slide:

  12. meronippolito2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 6:31 PM      Reply

    Name: Meron Ippolito
    Topic: Fossil Evidence of Evolution
    Type of Science: Earth Science
    Performance Indicator:1.2i The pattern of evolution of life-forms on Earth is at least partially preserved in the
rock record.
    Slide 1 Topic: Famous Fossil discoveries
     Roach, John. “Ten Fossils That Trace The Story of Human Origins.” NBC Science. NBC, 24 Sept. 2012. Web. 14 Dec. 2012
    Lucy, the world’s most famous fossil Lucy, a 3.2 million-year-old Australopithecus afarensis named after the Beatles song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,” is perhaps the world’s most famous fossil. She was discovered in the Afar region of Ethiopia in 1974 and remains among the most complete skeletons of an erect-walking human ancestor ever found, with about 40 percent of her bones intact. Her discovery allowed scientists for the first time to determine that upright walking predated the big brains of modern humans. Lucy’s brain case is about the size of a chimp. In this photo, visitors view the Lucy skeleton at a Houston museum.
    Facts about other famous Fossil such as Lucy
    Pictures of the Fossils
    Where and who found them
    How fossils were reconstructed

    Slide 2 Topic: Fossil Evidence
    Padian, Armand De Ricqlès, Jack Horner, and Kevin . “Fossil Evidence.” Lines of Evidence:. University of California, 23 Jan. 2004. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    Today we may take fossils for granted, but we continue to learn from them. Each new fossil contains additional clues that increase our understanding of life’s history and help us to answer questions about their evolutionary story.
    What Fossils have taught humans about the past
    How the Evidence helps us with todays problem.
    Slide 3 Topic: Early fossil findings
    Padian, Armand De Ricqlès, Jack Horner, and Kevin . “Fossil Evidence.” Lines of Evidence:. University of California, 23 Jan. 2004. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    Names of Early paleontologists
    Names of Early Discoveries
    Pictures of drawings that the Paleontologists made of their finding
    Early fossil discoveries
    In the 17th century, Nicholas Steno shook the world of science, noting the similarity between shark teeth and the rocks commonly known as “tongue stones”. This was our first understanding that fossils were a record of past life.
    Two centuries later, Mary Ann Mantell picked up a tooth, which her husband Gideon thought to be of a large iguana, but it turned out to be the tooth of a dinosaur, Iguanodon. This discovery sent the powerful message that many fossils represented forms of life that are no longer with us today.
    Slide 4 Topic: Indication of Interactions
    Testing models of macroevolution, and especially the sufficiency of microevolutionary processes, requires good collaboration between molecular biologists and paleontologists. We report such a test for events around the Late Cretaceous by describing the earliest penguin fossils, analyzing complete mitochondrial genomes from an albatross, a petrel, and a loon, and describe the gradual decline of pterosaurs at the same time modern birds radiate. The penguin fossils comprise four naturally associated skeletons from the New Zealand Waipara Greensand, a Paleocene (early Tertiary) formation just above a well-known Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary site. The fossils, in a new genus (Waimanu), provide a lower estimate of 61–62 Ma for the divergence between penguins and other birds and thus establish a reliable calibration point for avian evolution. Combining fossil calibration points, DNA sequences, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analysis, the penguin calibrations imply a radiation of modern (crown group) birds in the Late Cretaceous. This includes a conservative estimate that modern sea and shorebird lineages diverged at least by the Late Cretaceous about 74 ± 3 Ma (Campanian). It is clear that modern birds from at least the latest Cretaceous lived at the same time as archaic birds including Hesperornis, Ichthyornis, and the diverse Enantiornithiformes. Pterosaurs, which also coexisted with early crown birds, show notable changes through the Late Cretaceous. There was a decrease in taxonomic diversity, and small- to medium-sized species disappeared well before the end of the Cretaceous. A simple reading of the fossil record might suggest competitive interactions with birds, but much more needs to be understood about pterosaur life histories. Additional fossils and molecular data are still required to help understand the role of biotic interactions in the evolution of Late Cretaceous birds and thus to test that the mechanisms of microevolution are sufficient to explain macroevolution.
    University, Oxford. “Molecular Biology and Evolution.” Early Penguin Fossils, Plus Mitochondrial Genomes, Calibrate Avian Evolution. Oxford University, 20 Mar. 2006. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 5 Topic: What Fossils help humans learn
    Stories of humans and scientists learning from Fossils
    Fossils are among the most valuable sources of information about the Earth’s history. They tell us about the organisms that lived on Earth from the time of the oldest fossils, about 3.8 billion years ago, to the present. By studying fossils we can learn not only about the creatures and plants of the distant past, but how they grew, what they ate, how they interacted, and many aspects of their behavior.
     
    Fossils reveal many fascinating facts about the past, but they do a lot more. Do you own anything made out of plastic? Plastic comes from oil, which also provides gasoline, gas heat, and many other necessities of modern life. Fossils are one of the most useful aids to finding oil, because oil tends to accumulate in the pores of particular rock layers. Rocks of different ages contain different fossils. Study of microscopic fossils brought up in chips of rock during drilling of wells has led to many major oil and gas discoveries. Also, the oil itself is derived from fossil remains of ancient organisms.
     
    Study of fossils has led to important new understanding about how life evolved on earth and about diseases, both ancient and modern. Fossils also help us understand past climates, including ice ages and periods that were warmer than our present climate. Knowledge from the study of fossils is helping geoscientists understand global warming and its effects. By studying the catastrophic extinction of the dinosaurs and many other life forms at the end of the Cretaceous Period, geoscientists have gained insight into the evolutionary implications of impacts by extraterrestrial objects. Investigating the physical and chemical characteristics of fossil organisms that lived during times of drastic climatic change helps us understand the implications of the changes we are making in our own environment.

    Slide 6 Topic: Why some people do not believe in evolution
    ast week, Gallup announced the results of their latest survey on Americans and evolution. The numbers were a stark blow to high-school science teachers everywhere: forty-six per cent of adults said they believed that “God created humans in their present form within the last 10,000 years.” Only fifteen per cent agreed with the statement that humans had evolved without the guidance of a divine power.
    What’s most remarkable about these numbers is their stability: these percentages have remained virtually unchanged since Gallup began asking the question, thirty years ago. In 1982, forty-four per cent of Americans held strictly creationist views, a statistically insignificant difference from 2012. Furthermore, the percentage of Americans that believe in biological evolution has only increased by four percentage points over the last twenty year.
    Leherer, Jonah. “Why We Don’t Believe In Science : The New Yorker.” The New Yorker. The New Yorker, 7 June 2012. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 7 Topic: How Fossils stay in such good condition
    People often think of fossils as being mineralized bones or shells stored in museums.  However, they can be any remains or traces of ancient organisms.  They even can be footprints, burrows, or casts of bodies with nothing else surviving.  Some of the best preserved fossils were rapidly frozen in permafrost soil or ice, dehydrated in dry desert caves, or encased in tree resin that hardened into amber.  In any of these three environmental conditions, even soft body parts can be remarkably well preserved indefinitely. 
    How the Weather affects how well the fossils preserve
    Where some of the most well preserved Fossils have been found.
    Slide 8 Topic: Conclusion
    Slide 9: Bibliography

  13. ibrahimmozawalla2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 6:40 PM      Reply

    Save on your computer and flash drive in a Word file called “LastnamePIPOutline2012″
    Directions: Your outline is a basic list of what you will include on your slides. Each slide should have its own number. If you are using a source on your slide, the source should be included on your outline. It is suggested that your first slides contain interesting facts about your topic, and your second slide(s) contain vocabulary words. After those, you may get into brief details about your topic to teach the class your performance indicator.
    Name: Ibrahim Mozawalla
    Topic: Levels of organization
    Type of Science: structures and functions of the human body
    Performance Indicator: 1.2a Important levels of organization for structure and function include organelles,
    cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and whole organisms.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction
    • Information: None
    • Text: Levels of Organization by Ibrahim Mozawalla. (list slide topics)
    • Source: None
    Slide 5 Topic: Organisms
    • Information: Orgamisms are living substances like plants, fungus, and animals. They can have one cell or more cells.
    • Text: Orgamisms are living substances like plants, fungus, and animals. They can have one cell or more cells.

    • Source: “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 3 Topic: Organ systems
    • Information: Organ systems are composed of two or more different organs that work together to provide a common function. There are 10 major organ systems in the human body, they are the:
    • Text: Organ systems are composed of two or more different organs that work together to provide a common function. There are 10 major organ systems in the human body, they are the:
    • Source: “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 4 Topic: Organs
    • Information: a structure that contains at least two different types of tissue functioning together for a common purpose is called an organ
    • Text: a structure that contains at least two different types of tissue functioning together for a common purpose. There are many different organs in the body: the liver, kidneys, heart, even your skin is an organ.
    • Source: “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 6 Topic: Tissues
    • Information: a lot of cells that work together to perform similar functions.
    • Text: a collection of cells that work together to perform similar functions is called a tissue. There are four types of tissues in the human body. The four tissues are epithelial tissue, connective tissue, muscle tissue and nerve tissue.
    • Source: “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 2 Topic: Cells
    • Information: Cells are in organisms
    • Text: Cells are located in organisms. The cell is the basic unit of a living organism. Cells are the basic unit of light.
    Source: Cell.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 7 Topic: Organelles
    • Information: Organelles are in the cells, organelles 
    • Text: ORGANELLES mean little organs. Basically this means that organelles have specific roles to play in how cells work just like organs help the body to function properly as a whole. Some organelles are separated from the rest of the cell by lipid bi-layers similar in structure to the cell membrane.
    • Source: “New Page 1.” New Page 1. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 8 Topic: Conclusion
    • Information: None
    • Text: The. By Ibrahim Mozawalla
    • Source: None

    Bibliography Slide: Cell.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    “New Page 1.” New Page 1. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

  14. ernievaughn2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 6:41 PM      Reply

    Name: Ernie Vaughn
    Topic: Genes in Cells
    Type of Science: Living Environment
    Performance Indicator (# & text): Herditary information is located in genes which is located within your cells.
    Topic: Genes in Cells
    Slide 1 Genes play a key role in physical traits (how we look). They line with chromosomes and the chromosomes are located in the cell. A cell is a small unit that makes up all living things.
    Cell Biology 9th ed
    Jane C Renee

    Slide 2 Topic: Chromosomes of each cell!
    A chromosome is an organized structure of DNA and protein found in cells. Chromosomal DNA encodes for most or all of organisms genetic information. http://www.allaboutscience.org

    Slide 3 Topic: Chromosomes in males and females!
    In humans we have 46 chromosomes which normally contain 23 pairs. . The 23rd chromosomes determine the sex in males and females. Females have two X chromosomes and males have X and Y.
    http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/basics/howmanychromosomes

    Slide 4 Topic: Double Helix DNA!

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is twisted in a helix like a spiral staircase. Each base attaches to a sugar molecule and a phosphate group.
    http://www.allaboutscience.org/dna-double-helix

    Slide 5 Topic: How DNA is passed to its offspring!
    DNA is passed to it’s offspring by replication. Your Chromosomes copies itself to pass on genetic information to a new generation. Cell Biology 9th ed Jane C Renee

    Slide 6 Topic: DNA sequences (A,G, C and T)
    The four bases that make up DNA are
    adenine (A), Thymine (T),
    cytosine (C) , Guanine (G)
    Human DNA consists of 3 billion bases. The order of sequence of these bases determine the information for making organisms like letters of the alphabet make different words.
    http://www.allaboutscience.org/dna-double-helix.htm

    Slide 7 Topic: How DNA makes proteins?
    The code of DNA directs the synthesis of RNA which directs making of proteins on the ribosomes. We look like are parents because our DNA sequence which codes for the production of proteins have similar structure.
    Cell Biology 9th edition
    Jane C Reece

    Conclusion
    In the human body each cell contains 25,000 -35,000 different genes. This information goes towards your traits which are inherited from your parents. Genes are lined on chromosomes and chromosomes are genes that are made of DNA ( Reece). Humans have 46 chromosomes or 23 pairs. Male and females are different because of chromosome 23. There are sometimes thousands of genes in one chromosome. Females have two X chromosomes and males have one X and Y. Chromosomes are organized structure of DNA. DNA is a double helix and consists of a five carbon sugar, a phosphate group and a base (A, C, G, T) (Reece). DNA is passed to it’s offspring by replication. DNA directs the synthesis of RNA which makes protetins. All humans have different DNA except for identical twins
    Bibliography slide:

  15. ernievaughn2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 6:59 PM      Reply

    Name:Ernie Vaughn

    Science Subject: Living Enyironment

    Specific Topic: Genes and Herditary information

    Performance Indicator (# & text): Herditary information is located in genes which is located within your cells
    Topic: Genes in Cells!
    Slide 1:Genes play a key role in physical traits (how we look). They line with chromosomes and the chromosomes are located in the cell. A cell is a small unit that makes up all living things.
    Cell Biology 9th ed
    Jane C Renee

    Slide 2 Topic: Chromosomes of each cell!
    A chromosome is an organized structure of DNA and protein found in cells. Chromosomal DNA encodes for most or all of organisms genetic information. http://www.allaboutscience.org

    Slide 3 Topic: Chromosomes in males and females!
    In humans we have 46 chromosomes which normally contain 23 pairs. . The 23rd chromosomes determine the sex in males and females. Females have two X chromosomes and males have X and Y.
    http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/handbook/basics/howmanychromosomes

    Slide 4 Topic: Double Helix DNA!

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is twisted in a helix like a spiral staircase. Each base attaches to a sugar molecule and a phosphate group

    http://www.allaboutscience.org/dna-double-helix

    Slide 5 Topic: How DNA is passed to its offspring!
    DNA is passed to it’s offspring by replication. Your Chromosomes copies itself to pass on genetic information to a new generation. Combining chromosomes from two people allows the DNA to be passed to its offspring. Cell Biology 9th ed Jane C Renee

    Slide 6 Topic: DNA sequences (A,G, C and T)
    The four bases that make up DNA are
    adenine (A), Thymine (T),
    cytosine (C) , Guanine (G)
    Human DNA consists of 3 billion bases. The order of sequence of these bases determine the information for making organisms like letters of the alphabet make different words.
    http://www.allaboutscience.org/dna-double-helix.htm

    Slide 7 Topic: How DNA makes proteins?
    The code of DNA directs the synthesis of RNA which directs making of proteins on the ribosomes. We look like are parents because our DNA sequence which codes for the production of proteins have similar structure.
    Cell Biology 9th edition
    Jane C Reece
    Conclusion
    In the human body each cell contains 25,000 -35,000 different genes. This information goes towards your traits which are inherited from your parents. Genes are lined on chromosomes and chromosomes are genes that are made of DNA ( Reece). Humans have 46 chromosomes or 23 pairs. Male and females are different because of chromosome 23. There are sometimes thousands of genes in one chromosome. Females have two X chromosomes and males have one X and Y. Chromosomes are organized structure of DNA. DNA is a double helix and consists of a five carbon sugar, a phosphate group and a base (A, C, G, T) (Reece). DNA is passed to it’s offspring by replication. DNA directs the synthesis of RNA which makes protetins. All humans have different DNA except for identical twins.
    Bibliography slide:

  16. ernievaughn2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 7:04 PM      Reply

    Name:Ernie Vaughn

    Science Subject: Living Enyironment

    Specific Topic: Genes and Herditary information

    Performance Indicator (# & text): Herditary information is located in genes which is located within your cells.
    Topic: Genes in Cells!
    Slide 1 Genes play a key role in physical traits (how we look). They line with chromosomes and the chromosomes are located in the cell. A cell is a small unit that makes up all living things.
    Cell Biology 9th ed
    Jane C Renee

    Slide 2 Topic: Chromosomes of each cell! A chromosome is an organized structure of DNA and protein found in cells. Chromosomal DNA encodes for most or all of organisms genetic information.

    Slide 3 Topic: Chromosomes in males and females!
    In humans we have 46 chromosomes which normally contain 23 pairs. . The 23rd chromosomes determine the sex in males and females. Females have two X chromosomes and males have X and Y.

    Slide 4 Topic: Double Helix DNA!

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is twisted in a helix like a spiral staircase. Each base attaches to a sugar molecule and a phosphate group

    Slide 5 Topic: How DNA is passed to its offspring!
    DNA is passed to it’s offspring by replication. Your Chromosomes copies itself to pass on genetic information to a new generation. Combining chromosomes from two people allows the DNA to be passed to its offspring. Cell Biology 9th ed Jane C Renee

    Slide 6 Topic: DNA sequences (A,G, C and T)
    The four bases that make up DNA are
    adenine (A), Thymine (T),
    cytosine (C) , Guanine (G)
    Human DNA consists of 3 billion bases. The order of sequence of these bases determine the information for making organisms like letters of the alphabet make different words.

    Slide 7 Topic: How DNA makes proteins?
    The code of DNA directs the synthesis of RNA which directs making of proteins on the ribosomes. We look like are parents because our DNA sequence which codes for the production of proteins have similar structure.
    Cell Biology 9th edition
    Jane C Reece

    Conclusion
    In the human body each cell contains 25,000 -35,000 different genes. This information goes towards your traits which are inherited from your parents. Genes are lined on chromosomes and chromosomes are genes that are made of DNA ( Reece). Humans have 46 chromosomes or 23 pairs. Male and females are different because of chromosome 23. There are sometimes thousands of genes in one chromosome. Females have two X chromosomes and males have one X and Y. Chromosomes are organized structure of DNA. DNA is a double helix and consists of a five carbon sugar, a phosphate group and a base (A, C, G, T) (Reece). DNA is passed to it’s offspring by replication. DNA directs the synthesis of RNA which makes protetins. All humans have different DNA except for identical twins.
    Biblography slide:

  17. ernievaughn2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 7:05 PM      Reply

    Ms.Silverstein it wouldn’t let me put the sources for the slides so I took them off.

  18. mariabaig2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 7:37 PM      Reply

    Name: Maria Baig
    Topic: History of the Atom Model
    Type of Science: Chemistry
    Performance Indicator: 3.1a the modern model of the atom has evolved over a long period of time through the work of many scientists.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction
    • Information:
    • Text:
    • Source:
    Slide 2 Topic: Democritus
    Information: Democritus argued that all matter consists of tiny, physically invisible particles. The Greek word atomos, in fact, means “indivisible.” Democritus taught that an infinite number of atoms exist and that they are in constant motion. The space between atoms, he said, is occupied by a void. Atoms were never created, according to Democritus, but have always existed, just as they are now. They are also eternal; that is, they cannot be destroyed.. Atoms have physical properties that explain the properties of matter, he said. Atoms of water, for example, are round and smooth, permitting them to slide over each other; conversely, atoms of fire have jagged edges.
    • Text: Democritus was born in 460 B.C. Matter has tiny particles in the air. Atoms are not created nor destroyed and that atoms are everywhere around us. Atoms take the properties of matter.
    • Source: Democritus.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 3 Topic: John Dalton
    Information: Dalton’s theory was that the atoms in each element are identical in size and weight. Since hydrogen is the lightest known element, he assigned it an “atomic weight” of one. “Compound atoms” (later called molecules) were formed when the atoms of one or more elements combined. Dalton also showed in his experiments that the atoms always combined in simple ratios: one to one, or two to one, or two to three, for example. That is, molecules are composed of predictable proportions that will always be the same. Ironically, he was mistaken about the proportion of water: he thought it was one atom of hydrogen and one of oxygen, whereas it was eventually proven to be two atoms of hydrogen and one of oxygen.
    Text: Dalton was born in 1766. All matter is composed of very small particles. 2. All atoms of a given element are identical.3. Atoms cannot be created, destroyed, or subdivided.4. In chemical reactions, atoms combine with or separate from other atoms.5. In chemical reactions, atoms combine with each other in simple, whole number ratios to form combined atoms.
    • Source: John Dalton.” Scientists: Their Lives and Works. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 4 Topic: Joseph John Thomson (j.j)
    • Information: Joseph John Thomson (J. J. Thomson, 1856-1940; see photo at the Science Museum, London) is widely recognized as the discoverer of the electron. Thomson was the Cavendish professor of Experimental Physics at Cambridge University and director of its Cavendish Laboratory from 1884 until 1919. For much of his career, Thomson worked on various aspects of the conduction of electricity through gases. In 1897 he reported that “cathode rays” were actually negatively charged particles in motion; he argued that the charged particles weighed much less than the lightest atom and were in fact constituents of atoms [Thomson 1897a, 1897b]. In 1899, he measured the charge of the particles, and speculated on how they were assembled into atoms [Thomson 1899]. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1906 for this work, and in 1908 he was knighted.
    • Text: Thomson was born in 1856. Founder of electron. Cathode rays.
    • Source: “Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson.” Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 5 Topic: Ernest Rutherford
    • Information: The electrons, Rutherford postulated, would have to be in constant motion, since the attraction of opposite charges would otherwise pull them into the nucleus. As charged particles, electrons should radiate electromagnetic energy during orbits, eventually losing momentum and spiraling into the nucleus. The radiated energy would be expected to change continuously across the electromagnetic spectrum as the momentum of the moving particle changed, yet this was not the observed behavior of atoms. Under normal conditions, they do not radiate energy at all.
    • Text: Rutherford was born in. stated constant motion. Losing momentum. Radiated energy.
    • Source: “Bohr atom.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012
    Slide 6 Topic: Niels Bohr
    • Information: Bohr applied the idea of quantized energy previously developed by Max Planck. His first assumption was that–in contrast to classical mechanics, where an infinite number of orbits are possible–an electron could be in only one of a discrete set of orbits, which he termed stationary states. Bohr’s proposed atom restricted electrons to orbits of certain “allowed” radii. An electron orbiting in one of these “allowed” orbits has a defined energy state, does not radiate energy, and does not spiral into the nucleus. Even though the electron is in constant motion, it does not emit electromagnetic radiation from a stationary state. Bohr concluded that energy changes in an atom occur only when electrons move from one allowed orbit to another. Electrons must absorb energy to move to a higher state (further from the nucleus) and emit energy when they move to an orbit of lower energy (closer to the nucleus).
    • Text: Bohr was born in 1885.electrons orbit nucleus. Doesn’t emit electromagnetic radiation.
    • Source: “Bohr atom.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 7 Topic: Enrico Fermi
    • Information: From 1926 to 1932, he joined other European physicists in working primarily on the theory of atomic structure, which Fermi helped to complete in the form that it is known today. By 1932 his attention shifted to the growing fields of theoretical and experimental nuclear physics. Soon thereafter, he developed his theory of b-ray emission, in which he gave mathematical evidence for the existence of the neutrino. This proved to be one of his major achievements in physics. Working with several collaborators at the University of Rome, including Edoardo Amaldi and Bruno Pontecorvo, Fermi then went on to study the slowing down of the neutron, another recently discovered atomic particle, in hydrogenous materials. By capturing the slow neutron in atomic nuclei, he made a comprehensive study of a big class of artificially radioactive substances. His work on neutron physics was recognized in 1938 when he received the Nobel Prize for Physics. The techniques and theories that he worked out during this period were also those that he later used in the “exponential pile” experiments, which led to the development of the first controlled uranium-graphite reactor.
    • Text: Born in 1901.b-ray emission. Existence of neutrino. Slowing down neutron.
    • Source: “Biographical Information.” Biographical Information. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 8 Topic: James Chadwick
    Information: Chadwick’s discovery of the neutron not only explained the hitherto unresolved problem of just what particles composed the nuclei of atoms but also gave a powerful tool to explore the nature of these nuclei. Starting in the mid-1930′s, Enrico Fermi and his group in Rome used neutrons as project- tiles; since they are not repelled by the electrical charge on nuclei, to bom- bard many elements toward the high end of the periodic table. They found that neutrons that had lost energy by collision with atoms were more success- ful in initiating nuclear reactions, and they pioneered the complicated study of the interaction of neutrons with uranium, which led to the L938 discovery of nuclear fission by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann.
    Text: Born in 1891. Discovery of the neutron. Elementary particle. Neutrons lost energy. Nuclear reactions.
    Source: http://www.csupomona.edu/~zywang/chadwick.
    Conclusion slide : the atomic structure has changed through the work of many scientists
    • Bibliography Slide:
    • : http://www.csupomona.edu/~zywang/chadwick
    “Biographical Information.” Biographical Information. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    “Bohr atom.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    “Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson.” Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012
    John Dalton.” Scientists: Their Lives and Works. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012
    Democritus.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012

  19. mariabaig2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 7:39 PM      Reply

    Name: Maria Baig
    Topic: History of the Atom Model
    Type of Science: Chemistry
    Performance Indicator: 3.1a the modern model of the atom has evolved over a long period of time through the work of many scientists.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction
    • Information:
    • Text:
    • Source:
    Slide 2 Topic: Democritus
    Information: Democritus argued that all matter consists of tiny, physically invisible particles. The Greek word atomos, in fact, means “indivisible.” Democritus taught that an infinite number of atoms exist and that they are in constant motion. The space between atoms, he said, is occupied by a void. Atoms were never created, according to Democritus, but have always existed, just as they are now. They are also eternal; that is, they cannot be destroyed.. Atoms have physical properties that explain the properties of matter, he said. Atoms of water, for example, are round and smooth, permitting them to slide over each other; conversely, atoms of fire have jagged edges.
    • Text: Democritus was born in 460 B.C. Matter has tiny particles in the air. Atoms are not created nor destroyed and that atoms are everywhere around us. Atoms take the properties of matter.
    • Source: Democritus.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 3 Topic: John Dalton
    Information: Dalton’s theory was that the atoms in each element are identical in size and weight. Since hydrogen is the lightest known element, he assigned it an “atomic weight” of one. “Compound atoms” (later called molecules) were formed when the atoms of one or more elements combined. Dalton also showed in his experiments that the atoms always combined in simple ratios: one to one, or two to one, or two to three, for example. That is, molecules are composed of predictable proportions that will always be the same. Ironically, he was mistaken about the proportion of water: he thought it was one atom of hydrogen and one of oxygen, whereas it was eventually proven to be two atoms of hydrogen and one of oxygen.
    Text: Dalton was born in 1766. All matter is composed of very small particles. 2. All atoms of a given element are identical.3. Atoms cannot be created, destroyed, or subdivided.4. In chemical reactions, atoms combine with or separate from other atoms.5. In chemical reactions, atoms combine with each other in simple, whole number ratios to form combined atoms.
    • Source: John Dalton.” Scientists: Their Lives and Works. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 4 Topic: Joseph John Thomson (j.j)
    • Information: Joseph John Thomson (J. J. Thomson, 1856-1940; see photo at the Science Museum, London) is widely recognized as the discoverer of the electron. Thomson was the Cavendish professor of Experimental Physics at Cambridge University and director of its Cavendish Laboratory from 1884 until 1919. For much of his career, Thomson worked on various aspects of the conduction of electricity through gases. In 1897 he reported that “cathode rays” were actually negatively charged particles in motion; he argued that the charged particles weighed much less than the lightest atom and were in fact constituents of atoms [Thomson 1897a, 1897b]. In 1899, he measured the charge of the particles, and speculated on how they were assembled into atoms [Thomson 1899]. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1906 for this work, and in 1908 he was knighted.
    • Text: Thomson was born in 1856. Founder of electron. Cathode rays.
    • Source: “Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson.” Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 5 Topic: Ernest Rutherford
    • Information: The electrons, Rutherford postulated, would have to be in constant motion, since the attraction of opposite charges would otherwise pull them into the nucleus. As charged particles, electrons should radiate electromagnetic energy during orbits, eventually losing momentum and spiraling into the nucleus. The radiated energy would be expected to change continuously across the electromagnetic spectrum as the momentum of the moving particle changed, yet this was not the observed behavior of atoms. Under normal conditions, they do not radiate energy at all.
    • Text: Rutherford was born in. stated constant motion. Losing momentum. Radiated energy.
    • Source: “Bohr atom.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012
    Slide 6 Topic: Niels Bohr
    • Information: Bohr applied the idea of quantized energy previously developed by Max Planck. His first assumption was that–in contrast to classical mechanics, where an infinite number of orbits are possible–an electron could be in only one of a discrete set of orbits, which he termed stationary states. Bohr’s proposed atom restricted electrons to orbits of certain “allowed” radii. An electron orbiting in one of these “allowed” orbits has a defined energy state, does not radiate energy, and does not spiral into the nucleus. Even though the electron is in constant motion, it does not emit electromagnetic radiation from a stationary state. Bohr concluded that energy changes in an atom occur only when electrons move from one allowed orbit to another. Electrons must absorb energy to move to a higher state (further from the nucleus) and emit energy when they move to an orbit of lower energy (closer to the nucleus).
    • Text: Bohr was born in 1885.electrons orbit nucleus. Doesn’t emit electromagnetic radiation.
    • Source: “Bohr atom.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 7 Topic: Enrico Fermi
    • Information: From 1926 to 1932, he joined other European physicists in working primarily on the theory of atomic structure, which Fermi helped to complete in the form that it is known today. By 1932 his attention shifted to the growing fields of theoretical and experimental nuclear physics. Soon thereafter, he developed his theory of b-ray emission, in which he gave mathematical evidence for the existence of the neutrino. This proved to be one of his major achievements in physics. Working with several collaborators at the University of Rome, including Edoardo Amaldi and Bruno Pontecorvo, Fermi then went on to study the slowing down of the neutron, another recently discovered atomic particle, in hydrogenous materials. By capturing the slow neutron in atomic nuclei, he made a comprehensive study of a big class of artificially radioactive substances. His work on neutron physics was recognized in 1938 when he received the Nobel Prize for Physics. The techniques and theories that he worked out during this period were also those that he later used in the “exponential pile” experiments, which led to the development of the first controlled uranium-graphite reactor.
    • Text: Born in 1901.b-ray emission. Existence of neutrino. Slowing down neutron.
    • Source: “Biographical Information.” Biographical Information. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 8 Topic: James Chadwick
    Information: Chadwick’s discovery of the neutron not only explained the hitherto unresolved problem of just what particles composed the nuclei of atoms but also gave a powerful tool to explore the nature of these nuclei. Starting in the mid-1930′s, Enrico Fermi and his group in Rome used neutrons as project- tiles; since they are not repelled by the electrical charge on nuclei, to bom- bard many elements toward the high end of the periodic table. They found that neutrons that had lost energy by collision with atoms were more success- ful in initiating nuclear reactions, and they pioneered the complicated study of the interaction of neutrons with uranium, which led to the L938 discovery of nuclear fission by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann.
    Text: Born in 1891. Discovery of the neutron. Elementary particle. Neutrons lost energy. Nuclear reactions.
    Source: http://www.csupomona.edu/~zywang/chadwick.
    Conclusion slide : the atomic structure has changed through the work of many scientists
    • Bibliography Slide:
    • : http://www.csupomona.edu/~zywang/chadwick
    “Biographical Information.” Biographical Information. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    “Bohr atom.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    “Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson.” Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012
    John Dalton.” Scientists: Their Lives and Works. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012
    Democritus.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012

  20. mariabaig2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 7:45 PM      Reply

    Name: Maria Baig
    Topic: History of the Atom Model
    Type of Science: Chemistry
    Performance Indicator: 3.1a the modern model of the atom has evolved over a long period of time through the work of many scientists.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction
    • Information:
    • Text:
    • Source:
    Slide 2 Topic: Democritus
    Information: Democritus argued that all matter consists of tiny, physically invisible particles. The Greek word atomos, in fact, means “indivisible.” Democritus taught that an infinite number of atoms exist and that they are in constant motion. The space between atoms, he said, is occupied by a void. Atoms were never created, according to Democritus, but have always existed, just as they are now. They are also eternal; that is, they cannot be destroyed.. Atoms have physical properties that explain the properties of matter, he said. Atoms of water, for example, are round and smooth, permitting them to slide over each other; conversely, atoms of fire have jagged edges.
    • Text: Democritus was born in 460 B.C. Matter has tiny particles in the air. Atoms are not created nor destroyed and that atoms are everywhere around us. Atoms take the properties of matter.
    • Source: Democritus.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 3 Topic: John Dalton
    Information: Dalton’s theory was that the atoms in each element are identical in size and weight. Since hydrogen is the lightest known element, he assigned it an “atomic weight” of one. “Compound atoms” (later called molecules) were formed when the atoms of one or more elements combined. Dalton also showed in his experiments that the atoms always combined in simple ratios: one to one, or two to one, or two to three, for example. That is, molecules are composed of predictable proportions that will always be the same. Ironically, he was mistaken about the proportion of water: he thought it was one atom of hydrogen and one of oxygen, whereas it was eventually proven to be two atoms of hydrogen and one of oxygen.
    Text: Dalton was born in 1766. All matter is composed of very small particles. 2. All atoms of a given element are identical.3. Atoms cannot be created, destroyed, or subdivided.4. In chemical reactions, atoms combine with or separate from other atoms.5. In chemical reactions, atoms combine with each other in simple, whole number ratios to form combined atoms.
    • Source: John Dalton.” Scientists: Their Lives and Works. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 4 Topic: Joseph John Thomson (j.j)
    • Information: Joseph John Thomson (J. J. Thomson, 1856-1940; see photo at the Science Museum, London) is widely recognized as the discoverer of the electron. Thomson was the Cavendish professor of Experimental Physics at Cambridge University and director of its Cavendish Laboratory from 1884 until 1919. For much of his career, Thomson worked on various aspects of the conduction of electricity through gases. In 1897 he reported that “cathode rays” were actually negatively charged particles in motion; he argued that the charged particles weighed much less than the lightest atom and were in fact constituents of atoms [Thomson 1897a, 1897b]. In 1899, he measured the charge of the particles, and speculated on how they were assembled into atoms [Thomson 1899]. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1906 for this work, and in 1908 he was knighted.
    • Text: Thomson was born in 1856. Founder of electron. Cathode rays.
    • Source: “Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson.” Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 5 Topic: Ernest Rutherford
    • Information: The electrons, Rutherford postulated, would have to be in constant motion, since the attraction of opposite charges would otherwise pull them into the nucleus. As charged particles, electrons should radiate electromagnetic energy during orbits, eventually losing momentum and spiraling into the nucleus. The radiated energy would be expected to change continuously across the electromagnetic spectrum as the momentum of the moving particle changed, yet this was not the observed behavior of atoms. Under normal conditions, they do not radiate energy at all.
    • Text: Rutherford was born in. stated constant motion. Losing momentum. Radiated energy.
    • Source: “Bohr atom.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012
    Slide 6 Topic: Niels Bohr
    • Information: Bohr applied the idea of quantized energy previously developed by Max Planck. His first assumption was that–in contrast to classical mechanics, where an infinite number of orbits are possible–an electron could be in only one of a discrete set of orbits, which he termed stationary states. Bohr’s proposed atom restricted electrons to orbits of certain “allowed” radii. An electron orbiting in one of these “allowed” orbits has a defined energy state, does not radiate energy, and does not spiral into the nucleus. Even though the electron is in constant motion, it does not emit electromagnetic radiation from a stationary state. Bohr concluded that energy changes in an atom occur only when electrons move from one allowed orbit to another. Electrons must absorb energy to move to a higher state (further from the nucleus) and emit energy when they move to an orbit of lower energy (closer to the nucleus).
    • Text: Bohr was born in 1885.electrons orbit nucleus. Doesn’t emit electromagnetic radiation.
    • Source: “Bohr atom.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 7 Topic: Enrico Fermi
    • Information: From 1926 to 1932, he joined other European physicists in working primarily on the theory of atomic structure, which Fermi helped to complete in the form that it is known today. By 1932 his attention shifted to the growing fields of theoretical and experimental nuclear physics. Soon thereafter, he developed his theory of b-ray emission, in which he gave mathematical evidence for the existence of the neutrino. This proved to be one of his major achievements in physics. Working with several collaborators at the University of Rome, including Edoardo Amaldi and Bruno Pontecorvo, Fermi then went on to study the slowing down of the neutron, another recently discovered atomic particle, in hydrogenous materials. By capturing the slow neutron in atomic nuclei, he made a comprehensive study of a big class of artificially radioactive substances. His work on neutron physics was recognized in 1938 when he received the Nobel Prize for Physics. The techniques and theories that he worked out during this period were also those that he later used in the “exponential pile” experiments, which led to the development of the first controlled uranium-graphite reactor.
    • Text: Born in 1901.b-ray emission. Existence of neutrino. Slowing down neutron.
    • Source: “Biographical Information.” Biographical Information. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 8 Topic: James Chadwick
    Information: Chadwick’s discovery of the neutron not only explained the hitherto unresolved problem of just what particles composed the nuclei of atoms but also gave a powerful tool to explore the nature of these nuclei. Starting in the mid-1930′s, Enrico Fermi and his group in Rome used neutrons as project- tiles; since they are not repelled by the electrical charge on nuclei, to bom- bard many elements toward the high end of the periodic table. They found that neutrons that had lost energy by collision with atoms were more success- ful in initiating nuclear reactions, and they pioneered the complicated study of the interaction of neutrons with uranium, which led to the L938 discovery of nuclear fission by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann.
    Text: Born in 1891. Discovery of the neutron. Elementary particle. Neutrons lost energy. Nuclear reactions.
    Source: http://www.csupomona.edu/~zywang/chadwick.
    Conclusion slide : the atomic structure has changed through the work of many scientists
    Bibliography Slide:
    http://www.csupomona.edu/~zywang/chadwick
    “Biographical Information.” Biographical Information. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    “Bohr atom.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    “Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson.” Discovery of the Electron: J. J. Thomson. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012
    John Dalton.” Scientists: Their Lives and Works. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012
    Democritus.” World of Scientific Discovery. Gale, 2006. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012

  21. zainabk2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 7:53 PM      Reply

    Name: Zainab Kumandan
    Topic: producers, consumers, and decomposers
    Type of Science: Living Environment
    Performance Indicator: 1.1a Populations can be categorized by the function they serve.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction/ ecosystems
    Information: Ecosystems vary in size. They can be as small as a puddle or as large as the Earth itself. Any group of living and nonliving things interacting with each other can be considered as an ecosystem. Within each ecosystem, there are habitats which may also vary in size. A habitat is the place where a population lives. A population is a group of living organisms of the same kind living in the same place at the same time. All of the populations interact and form a community. The community of living things interacts with the non-living world around it to form the ecosystem. The habitat must supply the needs of organisms, such as food, water, temperature, oxygen, and minerals. If the population’s needs are not met, it will move to a better habitat. Two different populations can not occupy the same niche at the same time, however. So the processes of competition, predation, cooperation, and symbiosis occur.
    • Text: Ecosystems are a community of living organisms. They can vary in sizes. Some are small some are big. Ecosystems are like communities of living things.

    Source: http://www.fi.edu/tfi/units/life/habitat/habitat.html“Ecosystems.” World of Biology. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.

    •Text: Ecosytems are living communitys with non living components.
    Source: : http://www.fi.edu/tfi/units/life/habitat/habitat.html“Ecosystems.” World of Biology. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 3 Topic: Producers
    Information: Producers are organisms, like green plants, that produce organic compounds from inorganic compounds. These are also a type of autotroph. THen green plants, for example, are are eaten by consumers in this case, grazing animals like the zebra. In an ecosystem, producers are those organisms that use photosynthesis to capture energy by using sunlight, water and carbon dioxide to create carbohydrates, and then use that energy to create more complex molecules like proteins, lipids and starches that are crucial to life processes. Producers, which are mostly green plants, are also called autotrophs

    Text: Producers are the green plants. They make their own food. They use photosynthesis to capture energy, water and carbon dioxide. The produces are often also called autotrophs.
    Source: http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5192468_producer-ecosystem_.html

    Slide 4 Topic: Consumers
    Information: An ecosystem is defined simply as the living and non-living components of a distinct ecological unit. Several essential processes occur within an ecosystem to maintain its equilibrium and to recycle nutrients through the system. The components can be classified as producers, decomposers and consumers, in ecological terms. Producers or autotrophs, consist largely of plants that capture the energy of the system and supply food . Decomposers break down organic material for recycling through the system. An organism that generally obtains food by feeding on other organisms or organic matter due to lack of the ability to manufacture own food from inorganic

    •Text: consumers are organisms (including us humans) that get their energy from producers, regarding the flow of energy through an ecosystem. For example, producers, (such as plants), make their own food by the process of photosynthesis.
    Source: http://www.ehow.com/facts_5770576_role-consumer-ecosystem.html

    Slide 5 Topic: Decomposers
    Information: The third type of living organism in an ecosystem are the decomposers. Decomposers are plants and animals that break down dead plants and animals into organic materials that go back into the soil.
    •Text: Decomposer is an organism that processes dead organisms, helping them breakdown and/or dissolve. Examples would be bacteria, fungi, and worms.
    Slide 6: conclusion
    Slide 7: bibliography

  22. zainabk2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 7:55 PM      Reply

    My comment says its awaiting moderation??? It was not letting me put the links.

  23. rodn3ysuar3z Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 8:15 PM      Reply

    my Microsoft Word isn’t working so i cant post the homework i will still try to post it though.

    • rodn3ysuar3z Said,

      December 14, 2012@ 8:16 PM      Reply

      My email wont let me send u the link

      • rodn3ysuar3z Said,

        December 17, 2012@ 3:09 PM      Reply

        Name: Rodney Suarez
        Topic: Planets
        Type of Science: Earth Science
        Performance Indicator: 1b Nine planets move around the Sun in nearly circular orbits.
        ¥ The orbit of each planet is an ellipse with the Sun located at one of the foci. ¥ Earth is orbited by one moon and many artificial satellites.
        SLIDE 1 TOPIC: MERCURY
        • Information: Mercury is a small, bleak planet, and the closest planet from the Sun. Mercury is the smallest planet in the solar system now that Pluto has been demoted to a dwarf planet. Mercury is 36 million miles (58 million kilometers) from the Sun. Mercury is named for the Roman messenger god with winged sandals. The planet was given its name because it orbits the Sun so quickly, in just eighty-eight days.
        • Text: Mercury is a small, bleak planet, and the closest planet from the Sun
        • Mercury is 36 million miles (58 million kilometers) from the Sun.
        • Mercury is named for the Roman messenger god with winged sandals.
        Source: : “Mercury.” Astronomy & Space: From the Big Bang to the Big Crunch. Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 7 Dec. 2012.





        • Slide 2 Topic: Venus
        • Information: Venus is the planet closest to Earth. Venus and Earth have long been considered sister planets. Named for the Roman goddess of love and beauty, Venus has been thought of throughout history as one of the most beautiful objects in the sky, often referred to as a brightly glittering jewel. Venus is the second brightest object in the night sky, next to the Moon. Venus is also unusual in that it is the only planet besides Uranus to rotate from east to west. Thus, if one lived on Venus, the Sun would rise in the west and set in the east.
        • Text: Venus is the planet closest to Earth
        • Named for the Roman goddess of love and beauty,
        • Venus has been thought of throughout history as one of the most beautiful objects in the sky,


        Slide 3 Topic: Earth
        Information: Earth is the third planet from the Sun in the solar system. Earth’s age of about 4.6 billion years. Temperatures at the core of Earth may range as high as 7500 K, hotter than the Sun’s surface. Earth has a natural satellite. We call our single satellite the “Moon”
        • text: Earth is the third planet from the Sun in the solar system
        • Earth’s age of about 4.6 billion years.Temperatures at the core of Earth may range as high as 7500 K, hotter than the Sun’s surface.

        Slide 4 Topic: Mars
        • Information: The planet Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun. Early astronomers peered through telescopes and saw dark areas on the planet, connected by lines. Some imaginative scientists theorized that the dark spots were seas and that the lines were channels dug by Martian engineers to bring water to populated areas. Mars is about half the size of Earth and has a rotation period just slightly longer than one Earth day.
        • Text: The planet Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun
        • Mars is about half the size of Earth and has a rotation period just slightly longer than one Earth day.
        • The cold, thin atmosphere means that liquid water can’t exist on Martian surface for any length of time.

        Slide 5 Topic: Jupiter
        • Information: Jupiter is the fifth planet out from the Sun. It is also the largest planet in the solar system, which also includes the planets of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. It is thirteen hundred times larger than Earth, with three hundred times Earth’s mass.
        • Text: largest planet. Jupiter is the fifth planet out from the Sun. It is thirteen hundred times larger than Earth, with three hundred times Earth’s mass
        Slide 6 Topic: Saturn
        Information: Saturn’s most outstanding characteristic is its set of rings. The three other largest planets (Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune) also have rings, but Saturn’s are by far the most spectacular. Saturn, the sixth planet from the Sun, revolves around the Sun in a slightly elliptical orbit at a mean distance of 1.4294 billion kilometers (888,188,000 miles) in about 29.66 Earth-years. Perhaps best known for its rings, Saturn also has a large collection of moons orbiting around it.
        Text: Saturn’s most outstanding characteristic is its set of rings. Best known for its rings, Saturn also has a large collection of moons orbiting around it. Saturn consists primarily of gas.


        Slide 7 Topic: Uranus
        Information: Uranus was the first planet to be discovered that had not been known since antiquity. Although Uranus is just bright enough to be seen with the naked eye, and in fact had appeared in some early star charts as an unidentified star, English astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822) was the first to recognize it as a planet in 1781.The planet’s benign appearance gives no hint of a history fraught with catastrophe: sometime in Uranus’ past, a huge collision wrenched the young planet. As a result, the rotation pole of Uranus is now tilted more than 90° from the plane of the planet’s orbit. Uranus travels in a nearly circular orbit at an average distance of almost three billion kilometers (1.9 billion miles) from the Sun (about twenty times the distance from Earth to the Sun).

        • Text: a place where one day lasts forty-two (Earth) years. Uranus was probably struck by a large object that knocked it sideways. Uranus was discovered in 1781
        Source: “Uranus.” Space Sciences. Ed. Pat Dasch. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.Document URL

        • Slide 8 Topic: Neptune
        • Information: Neptune is the eighth planet in the solar system from the Sun by overall distance. As of 2006, it is the farthest known planet from the Sun; that is, after Pluto was demoted to a dwarf planet. It is the fourth largest planet by diameter in the solar system, and the third largest by mass.
        • Text: Neptune orbits the Sun once in every 165 earth-years. It was discovered on September 23, 1846, independently by British mathematician and astronomer John

        Slide 9 Topic: Conclusion
        • Information: it will include orbits, how the solar system works.
        • Text:
        • Source:

  24. raymondleveille2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 8:29 PM      Reply

    Name: Raymond Leveille III
    Topic: Chloroplasts and Photosynthesis
    Type of Science:
    Performance Indicator: 5.1b Plant cells and some one-celled organisms contain chloroplasts, the site of photosynthesis. The process of photosynthesis uses solar energy to combine the inorganic
    molecules carbon dioxide and water into energy-rich organic compounds (e.g., glucose) and release oxygen to the environment.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction, Plant Cells
    • Information: Plants have a number of different specialized cells that perform roles in the different plant tissue systems. Plants have three tissue systems: the ground tissue system, the dermal tissue system, and the vascular tissue system. Each tissue system carries out a different general function. The ground tissue system provides cells that carry out photosynthesis, storage, and support.
    • Text: Plants have a number of different cells that perform roles in the different plant tissue systems. Plants have three systems of tissue:, the dermal tissue system, the ground tissue system, and the vascular tissue system. Each tissue system carries out a different general function. The ground tissue system provides cells that carry out photosynthesis, storage, and support.
    • Source: http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2643350047

    Slide 2 Topic: Plants
    Information: Plants, also called green plants are living organisms of the kingdom Plantae including such, as well as, depending on definition, the green algae, but not red or browns weeds like kelp, nor fungi or bacteria. Green
    Text: Plants are living organisms and includes multicellular groups as flowering mosses, plants, ferns, conifers. Plants have cell walls with cellulose and characteristically obtain most of their energy from sunlight photosynthesis using chlorophyll contained in chloroplasts, which gives them their green color.
    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant
    Slide 3 Topic: Chloroplasts definition
    • Information: Chloroplasts ( /ˈklɒrəplæsts/) are organelles found in plant cells and other eukaryotic organisms that conduct photosynthesis and other chemical reactions. Chloroplasts capture the sun’s light energy, store it in the energy storage molecules ATP and NADPH and use it in the process called photosynthesis to make organic molecules from carbon dioxide and free oxygen from water
    • Text: Chloroplasts are organelles found in plant cells and other eukaryotic organisms that conduct photosynthesis and other chemical reactions. Chloroplasts capture the sun’s light energy, store it in the energy storage molecules and use it in the process called photosynthesis to make organic molecules from carbon dioxide and free oxygen from water.
    • Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloroplasts
    Slide 4 Topic: photosynthesis definition
    • Information: Photosynthesis is a process used by plants and other organisms to convert the light energy captured from the sun into chemical energy that can be used to fuel the organism’s activities.
    • Text:{same
    • Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photosynthesis
    Slide 5 Topic: glucose definition
    • Information: A simple sugar, C6H12O6, that is an important energy source in living organisms
    • Source: https://www.google.com/#hl=en&sugexp=les%3B&gs_nf=3&gs_rn=1&gs_ri=hp&tok=6EG0Mn9W1TLY3nPD1UUezw&cp=18&gs_id=3&xhr=t&q=glucose+definition&pf=p&tbo=d&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&oq=glucose+definition&gs_l=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bvm=bv.1355325884,d.dmQ&fp=465bcc43df61601f&bpcl=39967673&biw=1280&bih=709
    • Text: A simple sugar, C6H12O6, that is an important energy source in living organisms
    Slide 6 Topic: how it works
    Visual

    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion

    • Ms. Silverstein Said,

      December 17, 2012@ 3:32 PM      Reply

      You must put this in your own words for the slide text. You currently need to resubmit and do not have a passing grade because you did not follow directions.

  25. nicholaschen2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 8:41 PM      Reply

    ***I COULD NOT FIND ALL THE INFORMATION OF GALE SCIENCE IN CONTEXT OR .EDU SITES ONLY. THIS IS WHAT I WAS ABLE TO GET UP TO. I HAVE ALSO REMOVED ONE SLASH MARK IN EACH LINK, IN THE HTTP:// PORTION.

    Name: Nicholas Chen
    Topic: Energy Conversions
    Type of Science: Physics
    Performance Indicator: 4.1b Energy may be converted among mechanical, electromagnetic, nuclear, and thermal
    forms.

    Slide 1 Topic: Intro (To Energy Formes)
    Information:
    “Physicists, who are scientists who study force, motion and energy, say that energy is the ability to do work…”
    Text:
    What is Energy?
    Energy is the ability to do work.
    In this PowerPoint, we will be learning about different forms of energy and how they can be changed from one form to another.
    Source:
    “What Is Energy?” What Is Energy? N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    Slide 2 Topic: Energy Formes

    Information:
    “Although a body at rest relative to a reference frame has zero kinetic energy relative to that reference frame, it still maintains an energy of motion known as thermal energy… A body’s thermal energy is due to the random motion of its constituent atoms or molecules…”
    frame, it still maintains an energy of motion known as thermal energy.
    “Mechanics is the branch of physics that deals with the motion of objects and the forces that affect that motion. Mechanical energy is similarly any form of energy that’s directly associated with motion or with a force.”
    “Nuclear energy is energy released by the splitting or fusing together of atoms.”

    Text:
    What are the Different Formes of Energy?

    Thermal Energy- the energy of motion as a result of colliding molecules

    Nuclear Energy- the energy released in the splitting or fusing of atoms

    Electromagnetic Energy- the energy that travels through open space or a material in waves

    Mechanical Energy- the energy directly involved in motion or a force

    Sources: World Of Physics. “Thermal Energy.” Gale Science in Context. Gale Science, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. .
    “Matter, states of.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    Schroeder, Daniel V. “Chapter 2: Mechanical Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    Encyclopedia Britannica. “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Electromagnetic Radiation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .

    Slide 3 Topic: Thermal Energy to…***

    Information: “Some thermostats illustrate the conversion of thermal energy into mechanical energy of motion.”
    “The fundamental particles of which matter is composed are always in motion.”

    Text:
    How Does Thermal Energy Change From One Form to Another?

    Thermal energy can change from one form to another by thermal expansion, changing it to mechanical energy. Certain lanterns can use thermal energy to use heat to produce electromagnetic energy.
    Fact: Thermal energy exists in everything, due to the Kinetic Theory of Matter, and cold doesn’t exist.

    Sources: World Of Physics. “Thermal Energy.” Gale Science in Context. Gale Science, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. .

    “Matter, states of.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    • “Chapter 2: Forms of Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .

    Slide 4 Topic: Electromagnetic Energy to…***
    • Information:
    • Text:
    How Does Electromagnetic Energy Change From One Form to Another?
    Electromagnetic energy can change from one form to another by
    Fact: Electromagnetic energy is often referred to as radiant energy.
    Source:

    Slide 6 Topic: Nuclear Energy to…***
    • Information:
    • Text:
    • Source:

    Slide 6 Topic: Mechanical Energy to…***

    Information:
    “A spark generator converts mechanical energy of motion into the electrical energy of a spark.”
    “Mechanical energy of motion is converted into thermal energy when surfaces rub together, producing friction between the objects.”

    Text:
    How Does Mechanical Energy Change From One Form to Another?
    Mechanical energy can change from one form to another by certain generators and friction.

    Source:
    “Chapter 2: Forms of Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .

    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion

    Information: N/A

    Text: As one may see, states of matter can change into numerous forms.

    Source: N/A
    Bibliography Slide:
    *** ["..." Energy to...] is a refrence to how one form of energy turns into another form of energy.
    World Of Physics. “Thermal Energy.” Gale Science in Context. Gale Science, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. .

    “Chapter 2: Forms of Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .

    “Matter, states of.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

  26. zainabk2012 Said,

    December 14, 2012@ 9:15 PM      Reply

    I sent it to your email.

  27. judyjolibois2012 Said,

    December 15, 2012@ 11:42 AM      Reply

    Name: Judymae Jolibois
    Topic: autotropic or heterotropic nutrition.
    Type of Science: Living Enviroment
    Performance Indicator: 1.1a Populations can be categorized by the function they serve. Food webs identify the
    relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers carrying out either
    autotropic or heterotropic nutrition.
    Slide 1 Topic: Definition and Explanation of autotrophic Nutrtion
    • Information: Definition and Explanation of autotrophic Nutrition
    • Text: An autotroph is an organism that can produce its own food using light, water, carbon dioxide, or other chemicals. Because autotrophs produce their own food, they are sometimes called producers.
    • Source: education.nationalgeographic.com/encyclopedia/autotroph/?ar_a=1&ar_r=3
    Slide 2 Topic: Definition and Explanation of Heterotrophic nutrtion
    • Information: Definition and Explanation of Heterotrophic nutrtion
    • Text:
    • Source: http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O6-autotrophicnutrition.html
    Slide 3 Topic: Diffrence between Heterotrophic and Autrophic Nutrtion
    • Information:
    • Text: Autotrophs prepare organic food by photosynthesis however Heterotroph depends on autotrphs for food. Also Autotrophs They depend on solar energy directly and Heterotrophs They depend on solar energy indirectly.
    • Source: http://www.preservearticles.com/201101133222/difference-between-autotrophic-and-heterotrophic-nutrition.html
    Slide 4 Topic: Images of Hetertrophic and Autrophic nutrtion
    • Information:Images
    • Text:
    • Source: /www.mindfiesta.com/nutrition http://science-made-eazy.blogspot.com/2010/04/autotrophic-nutrition-photosynthesis.html ://www.geozoo.org/Topics/Nutrition
    • ://bridchicka.wikispaces.com/Design+Your+Own+Bacteria+Experiment-Bacteria+Off+of+Grocery+Cart+Handles
    • ://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/2010/renner_brad/nutrition.htm http://waynesword.palomar.edu/lmexer8.htm
    Slide 5 Topic: How Heterotrophic Nutrition effects society
    • Information: How Hetertrophic Nutrtion effects society
    • Text: Heterotrophic Nutrition depends on autotrphs for food.This cycle helps animals function
    • Source: •://bridchicka.wikispaces.com/Design+Your+Own+Bacteria+Experiment-Bacteria+Off+of+Grocery+Cart+Handles
    Slide 6 Topic: How Autotrophic Nutrition effects society
    • Information: How Autotrophic Nutrition effects society
    • Text: Autotrophic nutrition relies on photosynthesis to feed plants
    • Source: bridchicka.wikispaces.com/Design+Your+Own+Bacteria+Experiment-Bacteria+Off+of+Grocery+Cart+Handles

    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion
    • Information: : Conclusion
    • Text: Both heterotrophic and Autotrophic nutrition both help the earth and different ways. Heterotrophic nutrition caters the world’s wildlife and Autotrophic nutrition caters to plant by using photosynthesis.
    • Source: ://bridchicka.wikispaces.com/Design+Your+Own+Bacteria+Experiment-Bacteria+Off+of+Grocery+Cart+Handles://education.nationalgeographic.com/encyclopedia/autotroph/?ar_a=1&ar_r=3
    Slide 8 Topic: Bibliography
    Information: Bibliography
    • Source: sources from previous slides
    i had to take the “https” out

  28. jacobebert2012 Said,

    December 16, 2012@ 5:33 PM      Reply

    Name: Jacob Ebert
    Topic: Carrying Capacity
    Type of Science: Living Environment
    Performance Indicator: (# & text):6.1d The number of organisms any habitat can support (Carrying Capacity) is limited by the available energy, water, oxygen, and minerals, and by the ability of ecosystems to recycle the residue of dead organisms though the activities of bacteria and fungi.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction
    • Text: This PowerPoint project is about Carrying Capacity which is basically growth of individuals in different environments.
    Slide 2 Topic: Carrying Capacity Theory
    • Information: The concept of carrying capacity was pioneered early this century in studies of range management and wildlife management. Range surveys of what was then called “grazing capacity” were carried out on the Kaibab Plateau in Arizona as early as 1911
    • Text: The Theory of Carrying Capacity was created very early in the 1900s. This theory was made into a population theory later on
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644150232

    Slide 3 Topic: Earth’s Human Carrying Capacity
    Information: The annual rate of increase of the global population grew from an average of 0.04% per year between A.D. 1 to 1650 to a peak of 2.1% between 1965 to 70 then down to 1.6% per year in 1995. The population rate has continued to decline and is now 1.2%.
    Text: Human Carrying Capacity is now growing at a steady rate unlike other times.
    Source: msemac.redwoods.edu/~darnold/math55/DEproj/sp09/
    Slide 4 Topic: Population Impact
    Information: Homo sapiens is a species possessing a diversity of individual needs. Thus, sub-populations will have different requirements and different impacts on the environment. For example 100 million vegetarians will have a significantly different environmental impact than 100 million meat-eaters. This can be demonstrated by comparing the affect on water supplies by both sub-populations. About 1000 tons of water are needed to produce 1 ton of grain. Almost 40% of all grain is used in meat and poultry production. Add to this the amount of water that goes into the production of meat, and you can see that meat comsumption places more stress on global water supplies than grain consumption.
    Text: The Impact on Population all depends on what the species needs
    Source: http://www.wou.edu/las/physci/ch371/lecture/popgrowth/carrying.htm
    Slide 5 Topic: What Governs Population Size
    • Information: Four things govern population size Birth, Death, Immigration, and Emigration
    Text: The four things that governs population size are in a way survival of the fittest
    Source: http://www.wou.edu/las/physci/ch371/lecture/popgrowth/carrying.htm
    Slide 6 Topic: Biotic Potential
    • Information:
    Populations vary in their capacity to grow. The maximum rate at which a population can increase when resources are unlimited and environmental conditions are ideal is termed the population’s biotic potential. Each species will have a different biotic potential due to variations in
    the species’ reproductive span (how long an individual is capable of reproducing)
    the frequency of reproduction (how often an individual can reproduce)
    “litter size” (how many offspring are born each time)
    survival rate (how many offspring survive to reproductive age)
    Text: Biotic Potential is what all of us want in unlimited resources and it is also how long a species can survive for.
    Source: http://www.wou.edu/las/physci/ch371/lecture/popgrowth/carrying.htm
    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion
    • Text: So in conclusion Carrying Capacity is a vital thing to any species including humans

    Slide 8 Topic: Bibliography

  29. syedhasan2012 Said,

    December 16, 2012@ 7:05 PM      Reply

    Name: Ali Hasan
    Topic: Motion of the Moon and Planets
    Type of Science Earth Science
    Performance Indicator: Indicator: 1.1a most objects in the solar system are in regular and predictable motion
    Slide 1 Topic: Moon, Sun and earth
    Information Earths age is 4.6 billion years. The sun is one of the stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. The Moon is Earth’s only natural satellite. There are 70 total moons.
    • Text: The earth is almost 5 billion years old. The sun is one of the most important stars in the Milky Way Galaxy and The moon is earth’s natural satellite.

    • Source ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=true&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=GALE%7C00000000MV9U&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500123&userGroupName=s0

    • Slide 2 Topic: Revolution (earth)
    • Information: Throughout the year the earth revolves around the sun. Many parts of the earth experience changing seasons.
    • Text: Throughout the whole year the earth revolves around the sun. When it’s going through that motion the earths parts change. The seasons change.
    • Source: http://www.kidsgeo.com/geography-for-kids/0019-the-revolution-of-the-earth.php

    Slide 3 Topic: Heliocentric Theory
    Information The heliocentric theory argues that the sun is the central body of the solar system and perhaps of the universe. Everything else (planets and their satellites, asteroids, comets, etc.) revolves around it.
    Text: The heliocentric theory is a statement that says the sun is the central body of the solar system and maybe the earth.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644031091&userGroupName=s0003&jsid=c3e0fc4327df901
    Slide 4 Topic: Elliptical Planetary Orbits
    • Information: A small body in space orbits a large one (like a planet around the sun) along an elliptical path,
    • Text: It’s an object in space that orbits like a planet.
    • Source: http://www.wisegeek.com/why-do-the-planets-orbit-the-sun-in-an-elliptical-fashion.htm
    Slide 5 Topic: Moon’s Revolution
    • Information: The moon rotates once about every 27 days, and revolves once about every 27 days. So every time the moon goes around Earth it turns around one time
    • Text: The moon and earth revolve differently. The earth revolves every day. The moon revolves every 27 days.
    • Source: utahscience.oremjr.alpine.k12.ut.us/sciber06/6th/moon/html/rotate.htm

    Slide 6 Topic: Rotation
    • Information: All objects in the universe, including those in our solar system, move through space
    • Text: Every object in the earth even the things in our solar system move through space.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030741&userGroupName=s0003&jsid=bcb1129de9b7b7
    Slide 7 Topic: Length of day on different planets
    • Information: A day on earth is very different from the planets. A day on Mercury takes 58 days and 15 hours in Earth days. Venus is the slowest moving planet.
    • Text: The length of a day on earth is a lot shorter than the planets. Venus is the slowest moving planet.
    • Source: http://www.universetoday.com/37481/days-of-the-planets/
    Slide 8 Topic: Rotation vs. revolution (Conclusion)
    Information: Revolution is a complete trip of the earth around the sun. this takes one year. Rotation is a complete turn of the earth on its axis from west to east. This takes the earth one day.
    Text A revolution is a complete trip of the earth around the sun. Rotation is a complete turn of earth on its axis. It takes the earth one day.
    Source: http://www.snyder7hills.org/units/ss/ch1/rotrev.html

    Slide 9 Topic: Bibliography
    • Information:
    • Text

  30. rodn3ysuar3z Said,

    December 17, 2012@ 3:13 PM      Reply

    Name: Rodney Suarez
    Topic: Planets
    Type of Science: Earth Science
    Performance Indicator: 1b Nine planets move around the Sun in nearly circular orbits.
    ¥ The orbit of each planet is an ellipse with the Sun located at one of the foci. ¥ Earth is orbited by one moon and many artificial satellites.

    SLIDE 1 TOPIC: MERCURY
    Information: Mercury is a small, bleak planet, and the closest planet from the Sun. Mercury is the smallest planet in the solar system now that Pluto has been demoted to a dwarf planet. Mercury is 36 million miles (58 million kilometers) from the Sun. Mercury is named for the Roman messenger god with winged sandals. The planet was given its name because it orbits the Sun so quickly, in just eighty-eight days.
    Text: Mercury is a small, bleak planet, and the closest planet from the Sun
    Mercury is 36 million miles (58 million kilometers) from the Sun. Mercury is named for the Roman messenger god with winged sandals.

    Slide 2 Topic: Venus
    Information: Venus is the planet closest to Earth. Venus and Earth have long been considered sister planets. Named for the Roman goddess of love and beauty, Venus has been thought of throughout history as one of the most beautiful objects in the sky, often referred to as a brightly glittering jewel. Venus is the second brightest object in the night sky, next to the Moon. Venus is also unusual in that it is the only planet besides Uranus to rotate from east to west. Thus, if one lived on Venus, the Sun would rise in the west and set in the east.
    Text: Venus is the planet closest to Earth
    Named for the Roman goddess of love and beauty,
    Venus has been thought of throughout history as one of the most beautiful objects in the sky,

    Slide 3 Topic: Earth
    Information: Earth is the third planet from the Sun in the solar system. Earth’s age of about 4.6 billion years. Temperatures at the core of Earth may range as high as 7500 K, hotter than the Sun’s surface. Earth has a natural satellite. We call our single satellite the “Moon”
    text: Earth is the third planet from the Sun in the solar systemEarth’s age of about 4.6 billion years.Temperatures at the core of Earth may range as high as 7500 K, hotter than the Sun’s surface.

    Slide 4 Topic: Mars
    Information: The planet Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun. Early astronomers peered through telescopes and saw dark areas on the planet, connected by lines. Some imaginative scientists theorized that the dark spots were seas and that the lines were channels dug by Martian engineers to bring water to populated areas. Mars is about half the size of Earth and has a rotation period just slightly longer than one Earth day.
    Text: The planet Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun
    Mars is about half the size of Earth and has a rotation period just slightly longer than one Earth day.
    The cold, thin atmosphere means that liquid water can’t exist on Martian surface for any length of time.

    Slide 5 Topic: Jupiter
    Information: Jupiter is the fifth planet out from the Sun. It is also the largest planet in the solar system, which also includes the planets of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. It is thirteen hundred times larger than Earth, with three hundred times Earth’s mass.
    Text: largest planet. Jupiter is the fifth planet out from the Sun. It is thirteen hundred times larger than Earth, with three hundred times Earth’s mass

    Slide 6 Topic: Saturn
    Information: Saturn’s most outstanding characteristic is its set of rings. The three other largest planets (Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune) also have rings, but Saturn’s are by far the most spectacular. Saturn, the sixth planet from the Sun, revolves around the Sun in a slightly elliptical orbit at a mean distance of 1.4294 billion kilometers (888,188,000 miles) in about 29.66 Earth-years. Perhaps best known for its rings, Saturn also has a large collection of moons orbiting around it.
    Text: Saturn’s most outstanding characteristic is its set of rings. Best known for its rings, Saturn also has a large collection of moons orbiting around it. Saturn consists primarily of gas.

    Slide 7 Topic: Uranus
    Information: Uranus was the first planet to be discovered that had not been known since antiquity. Although Uranus is just bright enough to be seen with the naked eye, and in fact had appeared in some early star charts as an unidentified star, English astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822) was the first to recognize it as a planet in 1781.The planet’s benign appearance gives no hint of a history fraught with catastrophe: sometime in Uranus’ past, a huge collision wrenched the young planet. As a result, the rotation pole of Uranus is now tilted more than 90° from the plane of the planet’s orbit. Uranus travels in a nearly circular orbit at an average distance of almost three billion kilometers (1.9 billion miles) from the Sun (about twenty times the distance from Earth to the Sun).
    Text: a place where one day lasts forty-two (Earth) years. Uranus was probably struck by a large object that knocked it sideways. Uranus was discovered in 1781

    Slide 8 Topic: Neptune
    Information: Neptune is the eighth planet in the solar system from the Sun by overall distance. As of 2006, it is the farthest known planet from the Sun; that is, after Pluto was demoted to a dwarf planet. It is the fourth largest planet by diameter in the solar system, and the third largest by mass.
    Text: Neptune orbits the Sun once in every 165 earth-years. It was discovered on September 23, 1846, independently by British mathematician and astronomer John

    Slide 9 Topic: Conclusion
    Information: it will include orbits, how the solar system works.
    Text:
    Source:

    • rodn3ysuar3z Said,

      December 17, 2012@ 3:13 PM      Reply

      It made me delete the http:// part

  31. jasonrobles2013 Said,

    December 17, 2012@ 3:25 PM      Reply

    Name: Jason Robles
    Topic: Earth Science
    Type of Science: Plate Boundaries
    Performance Indicator: 2.1n many of Earth’s surface features such as mid-ocean ridges/rifts, trenches/subduction
    zones/island arcs, mountain ranges (folded, faulted, and volcanic), hot spots, and
    the magnetic and age patterns in surface bedrock are a consequence of forces associated
    with plate motion and interaction.
    Slide 1 Topic: Intro-what are tectonic plates
    • Information: A tectonic plate (also called lithospheric plate) is a massive, irregularly shaped slab of solid rock, generally composed of both continental and oceanic lithosphere.
    • Text: Tectonic plates are large rocks made of lithosphere.
    • Source: pubs.usgs.gov/gip/dynamic/tectonic.hmtl
    Slide 2 Topic: Convergent plates
    • Information: a convergent boundary, also known as a destructive plate boundary (because of subduction), is an actively deforming region where two (or more) tectonic plates or fragments of lithosphere move toward one another and collide.
    • Text: Convergent plates are destructive plates that collide with each other
    • Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convergent_boundary
    Slide 3 Topic: Land forms from convergent plates
    • Information: These convergent boundaries commonly cause volcanoes to form, as old crust melts. As two plates rub together, a number of small and large earthquakes are common near convergent boundaries.
    • Text: Some land forms from convergent plates are volcanoes and earthquakes
    • Source: kidsgeo.com/geology-for-kids/0046-convergent-boundaries.php
    Slide 4 Topic: Divergent plates
    • Information: divergent boundary or divergent plate boundary (also known as a constructive boundary or an extensional boundary) is a linear feature that exists between two tectonic plates that are moving away from each other
    • Text: Divergent plates are Plates that are moving away from each other.
    • Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divergent_boundary
    Slide 5 Topic: Land forms from divergent plates
    • Information: Thus, a divergent boundary is a boundary where two tectonic plates are moving away from one another. As we have already discussed, this most often takes place at ocean ridges.
    • Text: Land forms from divergent plates are ocean ridges
    • Source: kidsgeo.com/geology-for-kids/0045-divergent-boundaries.php
    Slide 6 Topic: Transform plates
    • Information: transform fault or transform boundary, also known as conservative plate boundary since these faults neither create nor destroy lithosphere,
    • Text: transform plates are faults that cannot destroy or create lithosphere
    • Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transform_fault
    Slide 7 Topic: Land forms from transport plates
    Information: Plate tectonics tells us that the Earth’s rigid outer shell (lithosphere) is broken into a mosaic of oceanic and continental plates which can slide over the plastic aesthenosphere, which is the uppermost layer of the mantle. The plates are in constant motion. Where they interact, along their margins, important geological processes take place, such as the formation of mountain belts, earthquakes, and volcanoes.

    • Text: Land forms from Transform plates are earthquakes and volcanoes
    • Source:earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/topics/plate_tectonics/rift_man.php


    Slide 8 Topic: Disasters from plate boundaries
    • Information: The world’s earthquakes are not randomly distributed over the Earth’s surface. An explanation is to be found in plate tectonics.
    • Text: disasters that occur from tectonic plates are earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountain ranges
    • Source: earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/topics/plate_tectonics/rift_man.php
    Slide 9 Topic: Conclusion
    Information:
    Text: Thanks for watching!
    Source:
    Bibliography Slide:

  32. nefissa Said,

    December 17, 2012@ 3:39 PM      Reply

    Name: Nefissa
    Topic: Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons
    Type of Science: Chemistry
    Performance Indicator: 3.1d the proton is positively charged, and the neutron has no charge. The electron is negatively charged.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction; Parts of an atom
    Information: There are three parts of an atom: protons, neutron, and electrons. Protons have a positive charge, electrons have a negative charge, and neutrons possess no net charge. Electrons are the smallest parts of the atom. They are the most numerous of the three. It has no known components or substructure, so it is an elementary particle. Its mass is 1/1836 of a proton. It is also considered to be a fermion. It has an antiparticle called the positron. The positron is identical to the electron except that it carries opposite charge. When an electron collides with a positron, both particles will either scatter or be destroyed producing gamma ray photons. Electrons can collide with other particles and be diffracted like light. Two electrons cannot occupy the same quantum state based on the Pauli Exclusion Principle. The proton is the part of an atom that helps to form the nucleus and has a positive charge. Protons must have an equal number of neutrons except in the hydrogen atom where a single proton exists on its own. A proton is composed of 2 up quarks and one down quark. They are considered to be fermions and baryons. They are held together by the strong nuclear force. The number of protons in the nucleus of an atom determines the atomic number.
    • Text: There are three parts of an atom. These parts include the proton, neutron and electron. The proton and neutron is found in the nucleus here as the electron is around the nucleus.
    • Source: http://www.universetoday.com/82128/parts-of-an-atom/

    Slide 2 Topic: Protons
    Information: A proton is a tiny particle, smaller than an atom. Protons are too small to see, even with an electron microscope, but we know they must be there because that’s the only way we can explain how atoms behave. To give you an idea how small a proton is, if an atom was the size of a football stadium, then a proton would still be smaller than a marble.Pretty much all of the protons in the universe probably got made very soon after the Big Bang. At first there was no stuff, just a lot of loose energy shooting around everywhere in the form of photons (light) and larger particles like photons called bosons. These early bosons had tons of energy and a lot of them broke apart into protons and anti-protons. Most of these protons and anti-protons eventually lost energy and hooked back up into bosons again, but some of the anti-protons seem to have gotten lost somewhere, and all the mass in the Universe comes from these left-over protons.All protons, everywhere in the universe, are exactly the same, and pretty much all of them are inside atoms. Different atoms have different numbers of protons; what makes an atom be a helium atom, or a gold atom, or an oxygen atom depends on how many protons it has, not what kind they are. Protons make the nucleus, or center, of an atom. The simplest atoms – hydrogen atoms – have a nucleus made of just one proton. But most atoms have more than one proton, and at least one neutron to go with each proton. Protons are actually made of even smaller invisible particles, called quarks. Each proton has three quarks, two up quarks and one down quark. A strong nuclear force sticks the quarks together. Most of the mass of a proton comes from this strong nuclear force, rather than from the quarks
    • Text: Protons are particles located in the nucleus of an atom. Many protons were discovered and made after the Big Bang. Protons are made up of small particles called quarks. One proton has three quarks (two up quarks and one down quark). All elements on the periodic table have protons, some more than others. For example, Hydrogen has one proton and Potassium has 19 protons.
    • Source: http://www.scienceforkids.kidipede.com/chemistry/atoms/proton.htm
    Slide 3 Topic: Neutrons
    • Information: Neutrons are the particles in an atom that have a neutral charge. They aren’t positive like protons. They aren’t negative like electrons. But don’t start thinking that they aren’t important. Every piece of an atom has huge importance to the way the atom acts and behaves. Neutrons are no exception.
    So, if an atom has equal numbers of electrons and protons, the charges cancel each other out and the atom has a neutral charge. You could add a thousand neutrons into the mix and the charge would not change. However, if you add a thousand neutrons, you will be creating one super-radioactive atom. Neutrons play a major role in the mass and radioactive properties of atoms. You may have read the page on isotopes. Isotopes are created when you change the normal number of neutrons in an atom.
    • Text: Neutrons, like protons, are located in the nucleus. They have a neutral charge. The neutron is found by the atomic number and atomic mass. For example, there are 6 neutrons in the element carbon.
    • Source: http://www.chem4kids.com/files/atom_neutron.html
    Slide 4 Topic: Electrons
    • Information: Electrons are the negatively charged particles of atom. Together, all of the electrons of an atom create a negative charge that balances the positive charge of the protons in the atomic nucleus. Electrons are extremely small compared to all of the other parts of the atom. The mass of an electron is almost 1,000 times smaller than the mass of a proton.
    • Text: Electrons are located around the nucleus. Electrons are negatively charged. Electrons are the smallest compared to the protons and the neutrons. Electrons are always the same number as the protons in a neutral atom. When an atom is positive, subtract the number of electrons and when a atom is negative, add the number of electrons.
    • Source: http://www.chem4kids.com/files/atom_electron.html
    Slide 5 Topic: Valence Electrons
    Information: The valence electrons are the electrons in the last shell or energy level of an atom. They do show a repeating or periodic pattern. The valence electrons increase in number as you go across a period. Then when you start the new period, the number drops back down to one and starts increasing again. A quick way to determine the number of valence electrons for a representative element is to look at which group is it in. Elements in group one have 1 valence electron. Elements in group two have 2 valence electrons.
    Text: Valence electrons are the number of electrons found in the outermost energy level. There is a certain amount of number that each shell can hold. 1st shell- 2 electrons 2nd shell- 8 electrons 3rd shells- 8 or 18 electrons 4th shell- 34 electrons etc. A diagram used to show the number of electrons is called the Lewis dot structure. Another quick way to find valence electrons is by looking at the group number. If an element is in the first group It has 1 valence electron. If it is in the second group it has 2 electrons. If an electrons is in group 13-18 subtract the group number and 10 and the number of valence electrons will be found.
    • Source: http://www.dl.clackamas.cc.or.us/ch104-06/valence_electrons.htm
    Slide 6 Topic: Periodic Table
    • Information: The periodic table is a table of the chemical elements in which the elements are arranged by order of atomic number in such a way that the periodic properties (chemical periodicity) of the elements are made clear. The standard form of the table includes periods (usually horizontal in the periodic table) and groups (usually vertical). Elements in groups have some similar properties to each other. There is no one single or best structure for the periodic table but by whatever consensus there is, the form used here is very useful. The periodic table is a masterpiece of organized chemical information. The evolution of chemistry’s periodic table into the current form is an astonishing achievement with major contributions from many famous chemists and other eminent scientists.
    • Text: The periodic table is a table of elements. It was firs arranged by Dmitri Mendeleev. His mistake was found by Henry Moseley. Dmitri Mendeleev arranged the first periodic table by the atomic mass but then Henry Moseley re-arranged the periodic table by atomic number. The periodic table includes varieties of elements, atomic number and masses and ionic charges.
    • Source: http://www.webelements.com/
    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion
    • Text: As seen the parts of an atom are the protons, neutrons and electrons and they all have special important parts in life.
    Slide 8 Topic: Biography
    • Text:
    “Parts Of An Atom.” Universe Today RSS. Universe Today, n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2012.
    “Protons.” – Science for Kids! N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2012.
    “Neither Here nor There.” Chem4Kids.com: Atoms: Neutrons. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2012.
    “Charge It!” Chem4Kids.com: Atoms: Electrons. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2012.
    “Valence Electrons.” Valence Electrons. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2012.
    “Home of the Periodic Table.” Periodic Table of the Elements by WebElements. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2012.

  33. aaroncallahan2014 Said,

    December 17, 2012@ 3:42 PM      Reply

    Name: Aaron Callahan
    Topic: heterogeneous and homogenous mixtures
    Type of Science: chemistry
    Performance Indicator: 3.1s
    Slide 1 Topic: intro
    Information: When different substances are mixed together, a homogeneous or heterogeneous mixture is formed.
    Text different substances or same substances mixed together equal homogenous or a heterogenous mixture such as grave hetero and water homo
    Source: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/mst/sci/documents/chemist.pdf\

    Slide 2 Topic: mixtures
    • Information: mixtures and how they act on our life
    Text: Most of the substances we see around us are mixtures, combinations of different elements or compounds. The components of some mixtures–such as sandy water, which consists of grains of sand suspended in water–can easily be separated or will naturally settle.
    Mixtures that settle–separate out naturally–are called suspensions.

    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644300886
    • Source:
    • Slide 3 Topic: SOLUTION
    • Information: what is a solution
    • Text: A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances. The term homogeneous means “the same throughout
    Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644300886&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=96f589d76babe1d99a3140cad5ee715f
    Slide 4 Topic: homogenous mixtures
    • Information: what is a solution
    • Text: A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances. The term homogeneous means “the same throughout.” For example, suppose that you make a solution of sugar in water.
    Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644300886&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=96f589d76babe1d99a3140cad5ee715f

    Slide 5 Topics: examples homogenous mixtures
    • Information: A solution is a homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.
    • Text: For example, suppose that you make a solution of sugar in water.
    Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644300886&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=96f589d76babe1d99a3140cad5ee715f
    Slide 6 Topics: heterogeneous mixtures
    • Information: about this topic
    • Text: heterogeneous means every piece you take is different
    • Source: gale resource and context
    Slide 7 Topics: examples of heterogeneous mixtures
    • Information: everything is different each and every piece
    • Text: sand, air, dirt, space
    Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/suic/NewsDetailsPage/NewsDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SUIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=News&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CA291051530&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=2a8ac584b38acc6cd7818c133e1f8bd2

    Slide 8 Topics: conclusion of both mixtures
    • Information: they are very different and are very needed
    • Text: if o2 wasn’t all the same we would die from breathing things like that in our body and some metals are mixed together and if it was the same through out they wouldn’t have the same properties
    Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/suic/NewsDetailsPage/NewsDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SUIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=News&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CA291051530&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=2a8ac584b38acc6cd7818c133e1f8bd2

    Slide 9 Topics: bibliography
    • Information:
    • Text: Studies from Myongji University Have Provided New Data on Science.” Science Letter 1 June 2012: 1408. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2012. Solution.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2012.
    • Source:
    Bibliography Slide: Studies from Myongji University Have Provided New Data on Science.” Science Letter 1 June 2012: 1408. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2012. Solution.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 17 Dec

  34. ibrahimsupersaiyan4 Said,

    December 18, 2012@ 4:12 PM      Reply

    Name: Ibrahim Bhatti
    Topic: Evolution
    Type of Science: living environment
    Performance Indicator: 1j Billions of years ago, life on Earth is thought by many scientists to have begun as
    simple, single-celled organisms. About a billion years ago, increasingly complex multicellular organisms began to evolve.
    Slide 1 Topic:
    • Information: He was trying to figure out how do our species evolve
    • Text: by the time he returned, the question in Darwin’s mind was not do species evolve, but how.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 2 Topic:
    • Information: Humans originated from ape like creatures 7000000 years ago
    • The modern study of human evolution is called paleanthropology this helps us answer questions
    Text: modern scientific study of human evolution is called paleoanthropology Humankind appears to have first evolved in Africa, and the fossils of early humans, or hominids, who lived between seven million and two million years ago, come entirely from Africa.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 3 Topic:
    • Information: It has made a major advance in technology
    Text: Evolutionary theory has proven useful outside of biology as well. The conditions required for evolution by natural selection are quite simple: a self-replicating system in which variations in the ability to reproduce are passed from parents to offspring. It turns out that many systems meet these conditions and not all such systems are biological. For example, languages can be said to evolve, as can minerals, technology, and possibly even universes.
    One area in which evolutionary thinking has led to major advances is computer programming. Using evolutionary thinking, computer programmers have designed systems in which different programs compete to accomplish a set task. At each iteration, variations are randomly introduced into program function in a manner analogous to genetic mutations. Variations that improve the performance of the program are preserved at the next stage, whereas less successful programs are eliminated. After many generations, an optimal programming solution to the given problem will be found. This algorithm gives programmers the ability to easily explore a vast swath of “program space” without writing each slight variant individually. Sometimes this method can produce solutions that are counterintuitive and that programmers would be unlikely to discover. Evolutionary programming has been used for such programming tasks as the design of electronics, quantum computing, and the development of competitive strategies
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 4 Topic:
    • Information: Humans have similar properties to other animals
    • There is evidence from fossils for evolution
    Text: Evidence for evolution comes in many forms, with some of the strongest derived from observations of living animals. First, there is the striking similarity among vertebrate embryos. Despite great variation in adult forms, early stages of embryonic development are virtually indistinguishable: the human embryo is not easily distinguished from the embryo of a fish or an elephant. This embryological similarity is consistent with a common ancestry among all vertebrates The distribution, morphology, and genetics of living populations all provide evidence for evolution, but the complete picture cannot be understood by the study of living populations alone. The origin of major new structures and body plans must be studied through the archive of evolution, the fossil record. In the sedimentary rocks deposited over the last several billion years of Earth’s history the ancestry of living organisms can be traced, and the mysteries of species origination and extinction can be explored.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 5 Topic:
    • Information: Paleontology is the study of prehistoric organisms
    • Text: Paleontology is the scientific study of the animals, plants, and other organisms that lived in prehistoric times.

    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 6 Topic:
    • Information: Allopatry and sympatry are terms used to describe the comparative distributions of populations and species
    • Text: Allopatry and sympatry are terms used in biogeography to describe the comparative distributions of populations and species. Species with sympatric distributions overlap in their geographical range to some degree. In contrast, allopatric species do not overlap in their distributions
    • Source:galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 7 Topic:
    • Information: Morphology is the study of animals forms
    • Text: Morphology, broadly defined as the study of animal form
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 8 Topic:
    • Information: Natural radiation exposure changes DNA molecules that is a change of genetics
    Text: These natural mutations are one of the factors that make possible continuous changes in the genetic constitution of a population that, in turn, allows for evolution to occur.
    • Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Slide 9 Topic:
    • Information: The embryo is moist and a heat makes its bones nerves and other parts of the body
    Text: According to his account, the embryo, which was moist, was activated by an inner fire, allowing it to attract the nourishment of its mother, which was also humid. The fire caused the embryo to solidify and dry gradually, forming such parts as bones and nervesSource: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&zid=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2642150194
    Bibliography Slide:

  35. ibrahimmozawalla2012 Said,

    December 18, 2012@ 5:41 PM      Reply

    Save on your computer and flash drive in a Word file called “LastnamePIPOutline2012″
    Directions: Your outline is a basic list of what you will include on your slides. Each slide should have its own number. If you are using a source on your slide, the source should be included on your outline. It is suggested that your first slides contain interesting facts about your topic, and your second slide(s) contain vocabulary words. After those, you may get into brief details about your topic to teach the class your performance indicator.
    Name: Ibrahim Mozawalla
    Topic: Levels of organization
    Type of Science: structures and functions of the human body
    Performance Indicator: 1.2a Important levels of organization for structure and function include organelles,
    cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and whole organisms.
    Slide 1 Topic: Introduction
    • Information: None
    • Text: Levels of Organization by Ibrahim Mozawalla. Cells, Organ systems, Organs, Organisms, Tissues, Organells.
    • Source: None
    Slide 5 Topic: Organisms
    • Information: Orgamisms are living substances like plants, fungus, and animals. They can have one cell or more cells.
    • Text: Orgamisms are living substances. They can have either one cell, or multiple cells

    • Source: “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 3 Topic: Organ systems
    • Information: Organ systems are composed of two or more different organs that work together to provide a common function. There are 10 major organ systems in the human body, they are the:
    • Text: Organ systems contain two or more different organs that work together to complete a common task. There are 10 major organ systems in the human body, they are the:

    • Source: “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 4 Topic: Organs
    • Information: a structure that contains at least two different types of tissue functioning together for a common purpose is called an organ
    • Text: Organs contain at least two different types of tissues together for a common purpose. There are many different organs in the body: the liver, kidneys, heart, your skin is an organ.
    • Source: “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 6 Topic: Tissues
    • Information:. a collection of cells that work together to perform similar functions is called a tissue
    • Text: a lot of cells that work together to perform similar functions is called a tissue. There are four types of tissues in the human body. The four tissues are epithelial tissue, connective tissue, muscle tissue and nerve tissue.
    • Source: “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 2 Topic: Cells
    • Information: Cells are in organisms
    • Text: Cells are located in organisms. The cell is the basic unit of a living organism. Cells are the basic unit of light.
    Source: Cell.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 7 Topic: Organelles
    • Information: Organelles are in the cells, organelles 
    • Text: ORGANELLES mean little organs. Organelles have specific roles to play in how cells work. Just like organs help the body to function properly as a whole.
    • Source: “New Page 1.” New Page 1. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    Slide 8 Topic: Conclusion
    • Information: None
    • Text: The. By Ibrahim Mozawalla. Hope you learned a lot about levels of organization.
    • Source: None

    Bibliography Slide: Cell.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Student Resources In Context. Web. 13 Dec. 2012.
    “Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems.” Basic Anatomy – Organs & Organ Systems. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.
    “New Page 1.” New Page 1. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

  36. ibrahimmozawalla2012 Said,

    December 18, 2012@ 5:42 PM      Reply

    This was my redo of the outline

  37. nicholaschen2012 Said,

    December 18, 2012@ 8:59 PM      Reply

    This is my redo. Like the previous post, I have removed one slash mark from each link.
    Name: Nicholas Chen
    Topic: Energy Conversions
    Type of Science: Physics
    Performance Indicator: 4.1b Energy may be converted among mechanical, electromagnetic, nuclear, and thermal
    forms.
    Slide 1 Topic: Intro (To Energy Formes)
    • Information:
    • “Physicists, who are scientists who study force, motion and energy, say that energy is the ability to do work…”
    • Text:
    What is Energy?
    Energy is the ability to do work.
    The different forms of energy and their respective conversions will be discussed in the following slides.
    • Source:
    • “What Is Energy?” What Is Energy? N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    Slide 2 Topic: Energy Formes
    • Information:
    • “Although a body at rest relative to a reference frame has zero kinetic energy relative to that reference frame, it still maintains an energy of motion known as thermal energy… A body’s thermal energy is due to the random motion of its constituent atoms or molecules…”

    • frame, it still maintains an energy of motion known as thermal energy.
    • “Mechanics is the branch of physics that deals with the motion of objects and the forces that affect that motion. Mechanical energy is similarly any form of energy that’s directly associated with motion or with a force.”
    • “Nuclear energy is energy released by the splitting or fusing together of atoms.”

    • Text:
    What are the Different Formes of Energy?
    Thermal Energy- the energy of motion as a result of colliding molecules
    Nuclear Energy- the energy released in the splitting or fusing of atoms
    Electromagnetic Energy- the energy that travels through open space or a material in waves
    Mechanical Energy- the energy directly involved in motion or a force
    • Source:
    • Sources: World Of Physics. “Thermal Energy.” Gale Science in Context. Gale Science, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. .
    “Matter, states of.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    • Schroeder, Daniel V. “Chapter 2: Mechanical Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • Encyclopedia Britannica. “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Electromagnetic Radiation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    Slide 3 Topic: Thermal Energy to…***
    • Information: “Some thermostats illustrate the conversion of thermal energy into mechanical energy of motion.”
    “The fundamental particles of which matter is composed are always in motion.”
    • Text:
    • How Does Thermal Energy Change From One Form to Another?
    • Thermal energy can change from one form to another by:
    • thermal expansion.
    • Certain lanterns [can use thermal energy to use heat to produce electromagnetic energy.] <- cut from reply
    Fact: Thermal energy exists in everything, due to the Kinetic Theory of Matter, and cold doesn’t exist.
    • Sources: World Of Physics. "Thermal Energy." Gale Science in Context. Gale Science, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. .

    “Matter, states of.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    • “Chapter 2: Forms of Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .

    Slide 4 Topic: Electromagnetic Energy to…***
    • Information: “Broadly applied, radiation refers to a class of physical phenomena that share a characteristic loss of energy in the radiating body or system.”

    • Text:
    How Does Electromagnetic Energy Change From One Form to Another?
    Electromagnetic energy can change from one form to another by:
    Light
    Convection (from sunlight heating air)
    Fact: Electromagnetic energy is often referred to as radiant energy.
    • Source:
    • “Light.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MVHM&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500279&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=1360ec96b947c1d4b56e6132f433db90
    • “Radiation.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MX3Y&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500421&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=9c1169d41eeb5b86a9c07bd85e981563
    • “Convection.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2011. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030579&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=f3de65cfd0086a2e23ab5b0ba9629e15
    Slide 6 Topic: Nuclear Energy to…***
    • Information: “Nuclear fission is a process in which the nucleus of an atom splits, usually into two pieces. When a fission reaction occurs, fragments fly apart with a large release of energy.”
    “Convection is the vertical transfer of mass, heat, or other properties in a fluid or substance that undergoes fluid-like dynamics.”
    • Text: Nuclear Energy can change from one form to another through:
    • fission.

    • Source:
    “Nuclear Fission.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MX02&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500348&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=8215bf7a60a094a4d23a3ca23e4aeec5

    Slide 6 Topic: How Does Mechanical Energy Change From One Form to Another?
    Information:
    “A spark generator converts mechanical energy of motion into the electrical energy of a spark.”
    “Mechanical energy of motion is converted into thermal energy when surfaces rub together, producing friction between the objects.”
    • Text:
    How Does Mechanical Energy Change From One Form to Another?
    Mechanical energy can change from one form to another by:
    Generators
    Friction
    • Source:
    • “Chapter 2: Forms of Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion
    • Information:
    • Text: As one may see, states of matter can change into numerous forms. FIN.
    • Source:
    Bibliography Slide:
    • Encyclopedia Britannica. “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Electromagnetic Radiation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • “What Is Energy?” What Is Energy? N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • “Light.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MVHM&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500279&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=1360ec96b947c1d4b56e6132f433db90
    • “Radiation.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MX3Y&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500421&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=9c1169d41eeb5b86a9c07bd85e981563
    • “Convection.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2011. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030579&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=f3de65cfd0086a2e23ab5b0ba9629e15
    “Nuclear Fission.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MX02&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500348&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=8215bf7a60a094a4d23a3ca23e4aeec5
    • “Chapter 2: Forms of Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    “Matter, states of.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    • Schroeder, Daniel V. “Chapter 2: Mechanical Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • Encyclopedia Britannica. “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Electromagnetic Radiation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • Sources: World Of Physics. “Thermal Energy.” Gale Science in Context. Gale Science, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. .
    • Schroeder, Daniel V. “Chapter 2: Mechanical Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • Encyclopedia Britannica. “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Electromagnetic Radiation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .

  38. nicholaschen2012 Said,

    December 18, 2012@ 9:11 PM      Reply

    Sorry, last changes.

    This is my redo. Like the previous post, I have removed one slash mark from each link.
    Name: Nicholas Chen
    Topic: Energy Conversions
    Type of Science: Physics
    Performance Indicator: 4.1b Energy may be converted among mechanical, electromagnetic, nuclear, and thermal
    forms.
    Slide 1 Topic: Intro (To Energy Formes)
    • Information:
    • “Physicists, who are scientists who study force, motion and energy, say that energy is the ability to do work…”
    • Text:
    What is Energy?
    Energy is the ability to do work.
    The different forms of energy and their respective conversions will be discussed in the following slides.
    • Source:
    • “What Is Energy?” What Is Energy? N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    Slide 2 Topic: Energy Formes
    • Information:
    • “Although a body at rest relative to a reference frame has zero kinetic energy relative to that reference frame, it still maintains an energy of motion known as thermal energy… A body’s thermal energy is due to the random motion of its constituent atoms or molecules…”
    • “Mechanics is the branch of physics that deals with the motion of objects and the forces that affect that motion. Mechanical energy is similarly any form of energy that’s directly associated with motion or with a force.”
    • “Nuclear energy is energy released by the splitting or fusing together of atoms.”

    • Text:
    What are the Different Formes of Energy?
    Thermal Energy- the energy of motion as a result of colliding molecules
    Nuclear Energy- the energy released in the splitting or fusing of atoms
    Electromagnetic Energy- the energy that travels through open space or a material in waves
    Mechanical Energy- the energy directly involved in motion or a force
    • Source:
    • Sources: World Of Physics. “Thermal Energy.” Gale Science in Context. Gale Science, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. .
    “Matter, states of.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 11 Dec. 2012.
    • Schroeder, Daniel V. “Chapter 2: Mechanical Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • Encyclopedia Britannica. “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Electromagnetic Radiation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    Slide 3 Topic: How Does Thermal Energy Change From One Form to Another?
    • Information: “Some thermostats illustrate the conversion of thermal energy into mechanical energy of motion.”
    “The fundamental particles of which matter is composed are always in motion.”
    • Text:
    • Thermal energy can change from one form to another by:
    • thermal expansion.
    • Certain lanterns
    Fact: Thermal energy exists in everything, due to the Kinetic Theory of Matter, and cold doesn’t exist.
    • Sources: World Of Physics. “Thermal Energy.” Gale Science in Context. Gale Science, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. .

    “Matter, states of.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    • “Chapter 2: Forms of Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .

    Slide 4 Topic: How Does Electromagnetic Energy Change From One Form to Another? • Information: “Broadly applied, radiation refers to a class of physical phenomena that share a characteristic loss of energy in the radiating body or system.”

    • Text:
    Electromagnetic energy can change from one form to another by:
    Light
    Convection (from sunlight heating air)
    Fact: Electromagnetic energy is often referred to as radiant energy.
    • Source:
    • “Light.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MVHM&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500279&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=1360ec96b947c1d4b56e6132f433db90
    • “Radiation.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MX3Y&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500421&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=9c1169d41eeb5b86a9c07bd85e981563
    • “Convection.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2011. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030579&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=f3de65cfd0086a2e23ab5b0ba9629e15
    Slide 6 Topic: How Does Nuclear Energy Change From One Form To Another?
    • Information: “Nuclear fission is a process in which the nucleus of an atom splits, usually into two pieces. When a fission reaction occurs, fragments fly apart with a large release of energy.”
    “Convection is the vertical transfer of mass, heat, or other properties in a fluid or substance that undergoes fluid-like dynamics.”
    • Text: Nuclear Energy can change from one form to another through:
    • fission.
    • Source:
    “Nuclear Fission.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MX02&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500348&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=8215bf7a60a094a4d23a3ca23e4aeec5

    Slide 6 Topic: How Does Mechanical Energy Change From One Form to Another?
    Information:
    “A spark generator converts mechanical energy of motion into the electrical energy of a spark.”
    “Mechanical energy of motion is converted into thermal energy when surfaces rub together, producing friction between the objects.”
    • Text:
    How Does Mechanical Energy Change From One Form to Another?
    Mechanical energy can change from one form to another by:
    Generators
    Friction
    • Source:
    • “Chapter 2: Forms of Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion
    • Information:
    • Text: As one may see, states of matter can change into numerous forms. FIN.
    • Source:
    Bibliography Slide:
    • Encyclopedia Britannica. “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Electromagnetic Radiation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • “What Is Energy?” What Is Energy? N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • “Light.” World of Physics. Gale, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MVHM&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500279&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=1360ec96b947c1d4b56e6132f433db90
    • “Radiation.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MX3Y&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500421&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=9c1169d41eeb5b86a9c07bd85e981563
    • “Convection.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2011. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    • Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030579&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=f3de65cfd0086a2e23ab5b0ba9629e15
    “Nuclear Fission.” World of Physics. Gale, 2010. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    http:/ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=true&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=GALE%7C00000000MX02&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500348&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=8215bf7a60a094a4d23a3ca23e4aeec5
    • “Chapter 2: Forms of Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    “Matter, states of.” U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science. U*X*L, 2007. Gale Science In Context. Web. 14 Dec. 2012.

    • Schroeder, Daniel V. “Chapter 2: Mechanical Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • Encyclopedia Britannica. “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Electromagnetic Radiation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • Sources: World Of Physics. “Thermal Energy.” Gale Science in Context. Gale Science, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. .
    • Schroeder, Daniel V. “Chapter 2: Mechanical Energy.” N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .
    • Encyclopedia Britannica. “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Electromagnetic Radiation. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Dec. 2012. .

  39. natfiore2012 Said,

    December 18, 2012@ 10:50 PM      Reply

    Name: Natalie Fiore

    Topic: Planet Formation

    Type of Science: Earth Science

    Performance Indicator: 1.2c Our solar system formed about five billion years ago from a giant cloud of gas and debris. Gravity caused Earth and the other planets to become layered according to density differences in their materials.

    ¥ The characteristics of the planets of the solar system are affected by each planetÕs

    location in relationship to the Sun.

    ¥ The terrestrial planets are small, rocky, and dense. The Jovian planets are large,

    Slide 1 Topic: Intro, definition of the Solar System

    Information:The first objects that qualify as small bodies are asteroids, discovered in the early nineteenth century
    largest asteroid, Ceres (the first asteroid to be discovered)
    Asaph Hall discovered Phobos and Deimos, the two moons of Mars are very small objects, each less than 30 kilometers (18 miles) in diameter and irregularly shaped. In 1892, Amalthea, a moon less than 250 kilometers (155 miles) in diameter
    Text:the first small bodies were asteroids
    the largest and first astriod to be discovered is Ceres
    the two moons of mars,Phobos and Diemos, are very small, irregularly shaped, and were discovered by Asaph Hall
    Source: ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2643750112&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=a142df450299bb52ff815734eb9258ef
    Slide 2 Topic: Geocentric Theory

    Information: the geocentric theory (in Greek, ge means “earth”), which maintained that Earth was the center of the universe.
    Galileo’s observations of Jupiter’s moons made it clear that celestial bodies do move about centers other than Earth
    Copernican model, Earth orbits the sun along with all the other planets
    Text: the geocentric theory said that earth was the center of the solar system and that all the planets rotated earth.
    the geocentric thory was wrong
    the copernican theory suggested that the earth rotates the sun along with the other planets
    Galileo’s theory was right, the planets don’t move around earth
    The planets move around the sun
    Source: ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030985&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=feff62cd9772d87c107ebd95ce235577
    Slide 3 Topic: Heliocentric Theory (what we believe)

    Information: The heliocentric theory argues that the sun is the central body of the solar system and perhaps of the universe. Everything else (planets and their satellites, asteroids, comets, etc.) revolves around it.
    Earth is round (nearly spherical)
    Text:the sun is the center of the solar system and the other planets, asteriods, etc. revolve around it
    Earth is almost perfectly round
    Source: ic.galegroup.com/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=SCIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Reference&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&source=&sortBy=&displayGroups=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644031091
    Slide 4 Topic: Terrestrial Planets

    Information:We note that the chemical evolution that finally led to the origin of life on Earth must be studied if we hope to understand the principles of how life might evolve on other terrestrial planets in the Universe. This is not just an anthropocentric point of view: the basic ingredients of terrestrial life, that is, reduced carbon-based molecules and liquid [H.sub.2]O, have very specific properties. We discuss the origin of life from the chemical evolution of its precursors to the earliest life-forms and the biological implications of the stellar radiation and energetic particle environments. Likewise, the study of the biological evolution that has generated the various life-forms on Earth provides clues toward the understanding of the interconnectedness of life with its environment.
    Text: we need to find out what made earth a terrestrial planet if we want to find out if there are other terrestrial planets
    terrestrial beings or things have special properties
    Source: ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/AcademicJournalsDetailsPage/AcademicJournalsDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Journals&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CA222559686&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=8bc1e6ee85d50d2d08a7e5afd4812235

    Slide 5 Topic: Jovian Planets

    Information:Since antiquity, five planets (from the Greek word for “wanderer”) were known to move across the background of the distant stars: Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. These were visible to the naked eye.
    In 1781, the British astronomer Sir William Herschel discovered Uranus.
    In 1846, the French scientist Urbain Le Verrier (1811-1877) and the British scientist John Couch Adams (1819-1892) predicted the existence and location of Neptune
    Lastly, in 1930, the American Clyde Tombaugh (1906-1997) discovered Pluto, which was considered a planet at the time
    Text: in the beginning there were were only 5 planets, which you could see without a telescope,
    those planets were mercury, venus, mars, jupiter, and saturn.
    william hershel discovered Uranus(1846), Urbain Le Verrier (1811-1877)and John Couch Adams(1906-1997) predicted the existance of Neptune
    (1903)Clyde Tombaugh discovered pluto
    Source:
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500391&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=689be629e4b8d93425ca6c643d572e51
    Slide 6 Topic: How Planets form

    Information:The solar system formed around 4.6 billion years ago from an interstellar cloud of gas and dust. When this gaseous cloud became unstable, it collapsed under the force of its own gravity and became a flattened, spinning disk of hot material. The region with the greatest concentration of mass became the Sun. The rest of the mass, perhaps only a little more than the mass of the Sun, eventually cooled enough to allow solid grains to condense, with rocky ones close to the Sun and icy ones farther away. The grains settled near the mid-plane of the disk, where mutual collisions allowed them to slowly grow into pebble-sized objects. At this point, the story is less clear. Some astronomers claim particle velocities in the disk remained low enough to allow the pebbles to stick to one another. Others argue that pebbles are generally not very sticky, and gravitational forces alone could cause concentrated swarms of pebbles to coalesce.
    Text: the solar system formed a long, long, long, long time ago (about 4.6 million years ago)
    it formed from a clod of gas and when it collapsed part of it pecame the sun
    the rest of it formed planets
    the planets formed because some of the gas cooled down enough(unlike the sun) to condense sold grains
    the more rocky one were facing the sun and the cooler ones weren’t
    even though the rock were not sticky, gravity hords the earth together
    Source: ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2643750104&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=952b8a8bb33e9b480391202cf419bf88
    Conclusion

    In conclusion the solar system(in general) is very complex. How the planets form is even more hard to understand. There are equations in terrestrial planets and between the geocentric and heliocentric theory, which do you believe?

    Bibliography

    Slide 1 Small Bodies.” Space Sciences. Ed. Pat Dasch. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 17 Dec. 2012.Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2643750112&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=a142df450299bb52ff815734eb9258ef

    slide 2

    “Geocentric theory.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644030985&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=feff62cd9772d87c107ebd95ce235577
    slide 3 “Heliocentric theory.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.

    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2644031091&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=974e9f62dfaa19372590f9f154ceac41

    slide 4 Beichman, Charles, et al. “Origin and evolution of life on terrestrial planets.” Astrobiology 10.1 (2010): 69+. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.

    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/AcademicJournalsDetailsPage/AcademicJournalsDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Journals&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CA222559686&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=8bc1e6ee85d50d2d08a7e5afd4812235
    slide 5 “Planets.” World of Physics. Gale, 2001. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.

    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2434500391&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=689be629e4b8d93425ca6c643d572e51

    slide 6

    “Planetesimals.” Space Sciences. Ed. Pat Dasch. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 18 Dec. 2012.
    Document URL
    ic.galegroup.com:80/ic/scic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?displayGroupName=Reference&disableHighlighting=false&search_within_results=&prodId=SCIC&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE%7CCV2643750104&userGroupName=nysl_li_shs&jsid=952b8a8bb33e9b480391202cf419bf88

    i had to delete the http://

  40. judyjolibois2012 Said,

    December 19, 2012@ 3:15 PM      Reply

    Name: Judymae Jolibois
    Topic: autotropic or heterotropic nutrition.
    Type of Science: Living Enviroment
    Performance Indicator: 1.1a Populations can be categorized by the function they serve. Food webs identify the
    relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers carrying out either
    autotropic or heterotropic nutrition.
    Slide 1 Topic: Definition and Explanation of autotrophic Nutrtion
    • Information: An autotroph is an organism that can produce its own food using light, water, carbon dioxide, or other chemicals. Because autotrophs produce their own food, they are sometimes called producers
    • Text:.An Autotroph can make their own supply of food by using a method called photosynthesis

    Slide 2 Topic: Definition and Explanation of Heterotrophic nutrtion
    • Information: A type of nutrition in which energy is derived from the intake and digestion of organic substances, normally plant or animal tissues. The breakdown products of digestion are used to synthesize the organic materials required by the organism
    Text: Heterotrophic Nutrition is a kind of nutrition in which energy is borrowed from the consuming of food of organic things.

    • Slide 3 Topic: Diffrence between Heterotrophic and Autrophic Nutrtion
    • Information: Autotrophs prepare organic food by photosynthesis however Heterotroph depends on autotrophs for food. Also Autotrophs They depend on solar energy directly and Heterotrophs They depend on solar energy indirectly.
    • Text: Autrophic nutrition is when organic food is produced however Hetrotrophic nutrition needs Autotrophs to supply them food.
    Slide 4 Topic: Images of Hetertrophic and Autrophic nutrtion
    • Information: Images
    • Text: These are images of Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Nutrtiom
    Slide 5 Topic: How Heterotrophic Nutrition effects society
    • Information: Heterotrophic Nutrition depends on autotrophs for food. This cycle helps animals function
    • Text: Heterotrophic Nutrition has Autotrophs supply them food to help animal function throughout their everyday lives.

    • Slide 6 Topic: How Autotrophic Nutrition effects society
    • Information: Autotrophic nutrition relies on photosynthesis to feed plants
    • Text: Autotrophic Nutrition depends on Photosynthesis to supply food to plants.

    Slide 7 Topic: Conclusion
    • Information: Autotrophs prepare organic food by photosynthesis however Heterotroph depends on autotrophs for food. Also Autotrophs They depend on solar energy directly and Heterotrophs They depend on solar energy indirectly.

    • Text: Both heterotrophic and Autotrophic nutrition both help the earth and different ways. Heterotrophic nutrition caters the world’s wildlife and Autotrophic nutrition caters to plant by using photosynthesis.
    Slide 8 Topic: Bibliography

  41. Ernie Vaughn Said,

    December 20, 2012@ 12:11 AM      Reply

    Name: Ernie Vaughn
    Topic: Living Environment
    Type of Science: Genes in Cells
    Performance Indicator: Genes play a key role in physical traits

    Slide 1 Topic: Genes

    Information: Genes are part of the DNA sequence called coding DNA. Noncoding DNA represents sequences that do not have genes and only recently have been found to have many new important functions. Out of the 3 billion base pairs that exist in human DNA, the sequence obtained from the Human Genome Project has revealed that there are only about 30,000 genes..

    Text: Genes play a key role in physical traits (how we look). They line with chromosomes and the chromosomes are located in the cell. A cell is a small unit that makes up all living things
    Source: Chromosome.” The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 2 Topic: Chromosomes of each cell

    Information: A chromosome consists of the body’s genetic material, the deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, along with many kinds of protein. Chromosomes contain the genes, or segments of DNA, that encode for proteins of an individual. When a chromosome is structurally faulty, or if a cell contains an abnormal number of chromosomes, the types and amounts of the proteins encoded by the genes are altered. Changes to proteins often result in serious mental and physical defects and disease.

    Text: A chromosome is an organized structure of DNA and protein found in cells. Chromosomal DNA encodes for most or all of organisms genetic information.
    Source: The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 3 Topic: Chromosomes in males and females

    Information::The human genome (which represents the total amount of DNA in a typical human cell) has approximately 3 x 109 base pairs. If these nucleotide pairs were letters, the genome book would number over a million pages. There are 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total number of 46 chromosomes in a diploid cell, or a cell having all the genetic material. In a haploid cell, there is only half the genetic material. For example, sex cells (the sperm or the egg) are haploid, while many other cells in the body are diploid. One of the chromosomes in the set of 23 is X or Y (sex chromosomes), while the rest are assigned numbers 1 through 22. In a diploid cell, males have both an X and a Y chromosome, while females have two X chromosomes.

    Text: In humans we have 46 chromosomes which normally contain 23 pairs. . The 23rd chromosomes determine the sex in males and females. Females have two X chromosomes and males have X and Y.

    Source: The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 4 Topic: Double Helix DNA

    Information: The 1950s were a big decade for DNA. While many researchers were working to prove exactly what DNA did, other scientists were racing to figure out how DNA was structured. In 1953 molecular biologists James D. Watson (1928-) and Francis Crick (1916-2004) solved the puzzle of DNA’s double-helix molecular structure. Their discovery is recognized as one of the most important scientific findings of the twentieth century.

    Text: DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is twisted in a helix like a spiral staircase. Each base attaches to a sugar molecule and a phosphate group.
    Source: “DNA.” Biology. Ed. Richard Robinson. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 5 Topic: How DNA is passed to its offspring!

    Information: Chromosomes in eukaryotes perform a useful function during mitosis, the process in which cells replicate their genetic material and then divide into two new cells (also called daughter cells). Because the DNA is packaged within chromosomes, the distribution of the correct amount of genetic material to the daughter cells is maintained during the complex process of cell division.

    Text: DNA is passed to it’s offspring by replication. Your Chromosomes copies itself to pass on genetic information to a new generation
    Source: The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 6 Topic: DNA sequences (A,G, C and T)

    Information: Prior to Watson and Crick’s discovery, researchers knew that DNA was made up of units called nucleotides. There are four types of nucleotides found in DNA, differing only in their nitrogen-containing bases: adenine (A), guanine (G), thymine (T), and cytosine (C). Each nucleotide consists of three components: a sugar deoxyribose, a phosphate group, and a nitrogen-containing base.
    Text: The four bases that make up DNA adenine (A), Thymine (T),
    cytosine (C) , Guanine (G).Human DNA consists of 3 billion bases. The order of sequence of these bases determine the information for making organisms like letters of the alphabet make different words.

    Source: Source Citation
    “DNA.” Biology. Ed. Richard Robinson. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 7 Topic: How DNA makes proteins?

    Information: DNA functions in the cell by providing a template by which another nucleic acid, called ribonucleic acid (RNA), is formed. Like DNA, RNA is also composed of nucleotides. Unlike DNA, RNA is single stranded and does not form a helix. In addition, the RNA bases are the same as in DNA, except that uracil replaces thymine. RNA is transcribed from DNA in the nucleus of the cell. Genes are expressed when the chromosome uncoils with the help of enzymes called helicases and specific DNA binding proteins. DNA is transcribed into RNA.
    Newly transcribed RNA is called messenger RNA (mRNA). Messenger RNA leaves the nucleus through the nuclear pore and enters the cytoplasm. There, the mRNA molecule binds to a ribosome (also composed of RNA) and initiates protein synthesis. Each block of three nucleotides, called codons, in the mRNA sequence encodes for a specific amino acid, the building blocks of a protein

    Text: The code of DNA directs the synthesis of RNA which directs making of proteins on the ribosomes. We look like are parents because our DNA sequence which codes for the production of proteins have similar structure.

    Source: The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 8 Topic: Conclusion

    Text: In the human body each cell contains 25,000 -35,000 different genes. This information is inherited from your parents and makes us who we’re today. Chromosomes are genes that are made of DNA. Humans have 46 chromosomes or 23 pairs. All humans have different DNA except for identical twins.

    Source:”DNA.” Biology. Ed. Richard Robinson. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.

    Slide 9: Bibliography

    DNA.” Biology. Ed. Richard Robinson. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012

    The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 4th ed. Detroit: Gale, 2008. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.
    :”DNA.” Biology. Ed. Richard Robinson. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2009. Gale Science In Context. Web. 19 Dec. 2012.


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